Author Topic: The dynamo and the tu-tu  (Read 29490 times)

Offline joe d

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #15 on: February 04, 2014, 01:46:13 PM »
Zee....  Zee-a-rama! 

Good to see you back.  But.... isn't there supposed to be some M&Ms in those photos?

Cheers,  Joe

Offline Alan Haisley

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #16 on: February 04, 2014, 07:26:06 PM »
Yeah, one or two M&Ms in each shot so we can judge the size of things. And if they don't pick up too much cutting fluid you can use new ones for the next picture.
Alan
Near Raleigh, NC, USA

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #17 on: February 04, 2014, 08:05:06 PM »
You can switch to Gummie Bears, we don't mind :lolb:

Whiskey

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2014, 09:07:54 PM »
Ha! Ha! Zeep! I am so glad to see you back again, it has been far too along for me. I have missed your humor and approach to machining tremendously…… It is a pleasure of r me to see/ watch you in action again………… :pinkelephant:


BC1
Jim

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #19 on: February 05, 2014, 12:20:05 AM »
Thanks all. Your comments really mean a lot.
I came home today with hope to do some more. As usual...I was pulled from my hole.

The M&M guy was/is Dean W. I did have a little M&M pin (mini-zee) that I used a lot...but mini-zee decided to move to another machinist's home.  :'(

I'm trying to come up with a suitable min-zee replacement...but like me...they're hard to find.  ;D

One daughter has made it to Missouri with her car encased in ice.
The other daughter is at a trade show in London and ran into a letch (an American one so it's particularly bad).  ;D
Daughter's stupid cat tore up a puzzle T and I were working on. Came home to a very unhappy T.
Other daughter's stupid dog couldn't wait for us to get home and thought our bedroom was an appropriate place to do her business.
Getting more snow and ice tonight.

The upsides...(there's always one)...

Daughters are safe.
I have fun thinking about how I might do away with the cat and dog.
And maybe I'll get another day off tomorrow and can get some machining done!

Life is bouncing between  :facepalm: and  :ThumbsUp:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Online Dave Otto

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #20 on: February 05, 2014, 01:22:38 AM »
At least the rabbit, tortoise, and the fish have there own little homes within ours!  :lolb:

Sorry Carl I couldn't resist.

Dave

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #21 on: February 05, 2014, 01:26:45 AM »
Before I forget...lest any one thinks I'm doing this while knowing what I'm doing...

I'm getting tips and techniques from IronHorse's thread back on HMEM where he has a log on the PMR Dynamo.
I've seen other builds or models as well (Marv has one) but I don't remember where so can't give credit to all. But it's due.

Not that there aren't gaps in those threads. IronHorse doesn't show facing the shaft and brush end castings.
So there will be opportunity to provide a 'unique' approach.  ;D

Just saw your post Dave. I've angled for a hamster, gerbil, or fish. All soundly rejected.
I don't know how my daughters get away with this.
(Well...yes I do. I'm such a sucker.)
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #22 on: February 08, 2014, 09:18:43 PM »
A little more done.

Here's the shaft end casting faced to fit the frame.
I used the four jaw which allowed me to grab the front end and indicate as close to center as I could.
Then indicated along the face to get it as true as I could.
Close enough.
Then faced it and took it down a bit more to fit into the frame.
I'm pretty happy with the fit.



I did the same with the brush end casting.



They fit pretty well. Maybe a little off-center to the left but may not be noticeable unless you really look.

Later I'll put the frame in the vise, clamp an end on and spot and drill the mounting the holes.
Indicating the frame hole will get me close but because the end is just a little off...I'll have to adjust a little so the bolts are close to center of the...the...don't know what to call them...the bulgie outie things that will be spot faced.

As for the hole on each end that holds the bushing...that will be done once the ends are mounted.
Should be tricky. I remember Marv warning me about that. I have some ideas. But I figure the end result will show the bushing slightly off center. We'll see. There may be enough play inside the frame to have the armature a little off rather than the bushing. I'd rather have it look decent at the expense of efficiency.

Sorry folks. Not a funny post and I have no joke to provide.
I need your input for material.  ;D
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline steamer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #23 on: February 08, 2014, 09:23:25 PM »
That's coming along nice Carl.   Is the center boss concentric with the spigot diameter?   If so you're in like Flynn!.....

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2014, 09:39:31 PM »
I think Zee, just as the women in your household, those sticking out bulgie things are. "BOSSES". You are moving right along, snow must be conducive to more shop time. I'm following along. I've been up cooking since midnight last night, so, I'm tired and can't help on the material input I don't think. Well, give me a few minutes and I'll see what I can do. >:D

Whiskey

Offline Don1966

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2014, 09:41:07 PM »
Looking good from here Carl, I think your on a roll there buddy.

Don

Offline mklotz

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2014, 09:51:12 PM »
To work correctly, the armature should be spaced equidistant from both magnets.  Assuming equal magnet thickness, this means that the armature shaft should lie on the center line of the bore in the body of the dynamo.  Keep this in mind as you set up to drill for the shaft bearings.

And, since your humor bank has run dry, here's a little story that seems apropos to this group...

                                A Shipwreck Tale
There was this male engineer, on a cruise ship in the Caribbean for the first
time. It was wonderful, the experience of his life. He was being waited on hand
an foot. But, it did not last. A hurricane came up unexpectedly. The ship went
down almost instantly.

The man found himself, he knew not how, swept up on the shore of an island.
There was nothing else anywhere to be seen. No person, no supplies, nothing.
The man looked around. There were some bananas and coconuts, but that was it.
He was desperate, and forlorn, but decided to make the best of it. So for the
next four months he ate bananas, drank coconut juice and mostly looked to the
sea mightily for a ship to come to his rescue.

One day, as he was lying on the beech stroking his beard and looking for a
ship, he spotted movement out of the corner of his eye. Could it be true, was
it a ship? No, from around the corner of the island came this rowboat. In it
was the most gorgeous woman he had ever seen, or at least seen in 4 months. She
was tall, tanned, and her blond hair flowing in the sea breeze gave her an
almost ethereal quality. She spotted him also as he was waving and yelling and
screaming to get her attention. She rowed her boat towards him.

In disbelief, he asked, "Where did you come from? How did you get here"?

She said, "I rowed from the other side of the island. I landed on this island
when my cruise ship sank."

"Amazing," he said, "I didn't know anyone else had survived. How many of you
are there? Where did you get the rowboat? You must have been really lucky to
have a rowboat wash up with you!"

"It is only me," she said, "and the rowboat didn't wash up, nothing else did."

"Well then," said the man, "how did you get the rowboat?"

"I made the rowboat out of raw material that I found on the island," replied
the woman. "The oars were whittled from gum tree branches, I wove the bottom
from Palm branches, and the sides and stern came from a eucalyptus tree."

"But, but," asked the man, "what about tools and hardware, how did you do
that?"

"Oh, no problem," replied the woman, "on the south side of the island there is
a very unusual strata of alluvial rock exposed. I found that if I fired it to a
certain temperature in my kiln, it melted into forgeable ductile iron. I used
that for tools, and used the tools to make the hardware. But, enough of that,"
she said. "Where do you live?"

At last the man was forced to confess that he had been sleeping on the beach.

"Well, let's row over to my place," she said. So they both got into the rowboat
and left for her side of island.

The woman easily rowed them around to a wharf that led to the approach to her
place. She tied up the rowboat with a beautifully woven hemp rope. They walked
up a stone walk and around a Palm tree; there stood an exquisite bungalow
painted in blue and white.

"It's not much," she said, "but I call it home. Sit down please, would you like
to have a drink?"

"No," said the man, "one more coconut juice and I will puke."

"It won't be coconut juice," the woman replied. "I have a still; how about a
Pina Colada?" Trying to hide his continued amazement, the man accepted, and
they sat down on her couch to talk.

After a while, and they had exchanged their stories, the woman asked, "Tell me,
have you always had a beard?"

"No," the man replied, "I was clean shaven all of my life, and even on the
cruise ship."

"Well if you would like to shave, there is a man's razor upstairs in the
cabinet in the bathroom." So, the man, no longer questioning anything, went
upstairs to the bathroom. There in the cabinet was a razor made from a bone
handle, two shells honed to a hollow ground edge were fastened on to its end
inside of a swivel mechanism. The man shaved, showered and went back
downstairs.

"You look great," said the woman. "I think I will go up and slip into something
more comfortable." So she did.

And, the man continued to sip his Pina Colada. After a short time, the woman
returned wearing fig leafs strategically positioned and smelling faintly of
gardenia.

"Tell me," she asked, "we have both been out here for a very long time with no
companionship. You know what I mean. Have you been lonely, is there anything
that you really miss? Something that all men and woman need. Something that it
would be really nice to have right now."

"Yes there is," the man replied, as he moved closer to the woman while fixing a
winsome gaze upon her, "Tell me ... Do you happen to have an Internet
connection?"
---
Regards, Marv


Home Shop Freeware
http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2014, 11:07:09 PM »
That's coming along nice Carl.   Is the center boss concentric with the spigot diameter?   If so you're in like Flynn!.....

Good question. Perhaps (probably) not. In which case my thoughts are for naught. I'll have more on this from Marv's response.

I've been up cooking since midnight last night, so

Believe me Eric...you are well done. Cook anymore and you won't be an appealing dish.

Thanks for looking in Don. You are sparse with material I can work with. Smart man.

Marv...you're right of course. I did a quick check and found there wasn't a lot of play between the armature and magnets. And given Dave's question...I'm thinking I was wrong in what I said. I'd better make sure that armature is centered and not worry so much if the shafts stick out of ends perfectly center.

Thanks for the tale. But what an idiot. He should've been asking if she had any vodka.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline mklotz

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #28 on: February 08, 2014, 11:19:15 PM »
Now the question becomes, "How to make sure it (the armature shaft) is centered."

As usual, I've forgotten how I did it.  (The CRS gets worse every year.)

Let's try to put some ideas together for discussion and dissection...

Drill and tap body for each end plate.

Attach one end plate.

Mount body in mill vise with attached end plate face down.

Center body bore using DTI

With body still held in vise, attach other end plate to body.

Drill hole in top end plate and use that as guide to drill hole in bottom end plate.
(May require long "aircraft" drill.) 

Of course this procedure could be done in the lathe with the body held in the 4jaw.  (I have a vague memory of doing it in the lathe.)
---
Regards, Marv


Home Shop Freeware
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Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #29 on: February 09, 2014, 07:48:02 PM »
Oh goodie. Job done and then I read Marv's post.  :o

Well this is what I did...

I put the frame in the mill vise. Both ends and bottom faced so hopefully it's nice and straight.
Then indicated the hole to find center.
Then clamped an end on. The end is a nice snug fit. Doesn't move around at all (except rotate).
Drilled and reamed to .249. I measured the bushings at .251. Hopefully they will press in well.
Here's a shot...



We'll see how well I did later.

Then I rotated an end such that the mounting bosses (I remembered, Eric!) were as square as possible.
Drilled one with a #47 into the frame, changed to a #37 only deep enough to get through the end, and then tapped.
Repeat.
Repeat...CRAP!  :Mad:
Broke drill bit. (I'd forgotten how grabby aluminum is and didn't squirt some WD-40.)  :facepalm:
Managed to get it out but I'm out of #37 so I'm done for now.
Luckily there's a local hardware store that carries these (usually).

But cool! Got a little more machining, a little more shop smell...
A whole lot better than the complete absence over the last 10 months or so.
Withdrawal symptoms are subsiding a little.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.