Author Topic: Hugh's blank canvas  (Read 1614 times)

Offline Hugh

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2020, 07:27:42 PM »
No new skylights or stairwells, just a few irate neighbours :)

The big challenge was that the entry to the basement was at the rear of the house - some 25-30m from the street and down about 15-20 stairs - and the machine was ~620 kg. We looked into methods of moving it using rails, prybars etc, but thought it easiest and safest to go with cranes instead.

After arriving on the back of a truck, the machine was lifted by the big crane using slings under the chip tray (as recommended in the manual) directly to the bottom of the stairs at the entry to the basement. We set it down on a pallet, then used rollers and a pry bar to move through the door, down some wooden planks and into the basement. Then it was pry bar and rollers to get it into position. Hopefully the photos will give you more of an idea!

Hugh

Offline crueby

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2020, 08:35:10 PM »
Wow!

Online Kim

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #17 on: May 13, 2020, 08:50:30 PM »
I'll say! Wow!

Looks like a nice tidy job on a very good looking piece of equpment!

And nobody got hurt, so, well done!

Kim

Offline Hugh Currin

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2020, 05:34:12 AM »
Hugh:

Congratulations on the new house, the new baby, and getting the very nice looking machine into the new shop. Good job!

I moved into a basement shop below a two car garage some 20 years ago. What I decided to do was cut a big hole in the floor and build a hoist. Two wood 6x6 uprights with an I-beam across the top. Then a chain hoist to lower the machines into the basement. The floor bolted back into place and good as new. Two years ago I moved the machines out via the same hoist. It was an adventure with a considerable pucker factor.






Tomorrow I pick up a rental forklift to put these two machines on  a utility trailer. We're moving to Prescott, AZ this week and the shop is part of the move.

Keep us updated. Thanks.

PS: You have a great first name there.
Hugh

Online Jo

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2020, 09:20:00 AM »
The good news is there is no worries of anyone trying to steal your Aciera  :ThumbsUp:

A friend of mine had his workshop in the roof of his garage. I am not sure which is harder taking machinery up or down a floor  :thinking: With his valuable cars underneath he had already made sure the builders put plenty of steel girders spanning under the workshop floor  ;)

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Hugh

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2020, 09:32:04 AM »
Hugh:

Congratulations on the new house, the new baby, and getting the very nice looking machine into the new shop. Good job!

I moved into a basement shop below a two car garage some 20 years ago. What I decided to do was cut a big hole in the floor and build a hoist. Two wood 6x6 uprights with an I-beam across the top. Then a chain hoist to lower the machines into the basement. The floor bolted back into place and good as new. Two years ago I moved the machines out via the same hoist. It was an adventure with a considerable pucker factor.

Tomorrow I pick up a rental forklift to put these two machines on  a utility trailer. We're moving to Prescott, AZ this week and the shop is part of the move.

Keep us updated. Thanks.

PS: You have a great first name there.

Wowzers! I'm guessing you followed the "measure twice, cut once" adage when going through with that for the first time. Those are some fairly serious chunks of metal there, too!

I have to say, the challenges in moving this stuff in and out of home workshops without proper access really makes one think seriously about machines before pulling the trigger on them (something I've never been particularly good at when it comes to cars, motorcycles, bicycles etc).

Hugh

Offline awake

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2020, 09:58:01 PM »
Hugh, I assume you had to cut some of the floor joists in the original installation, and in the removal. Did you sister replacement joists in, or ??
Andy

Online Zephyrin

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #22 on: May 15, 2020, 08:59:19 AM »
very impressive delivery !
large and cosy workshop and beautiful trees around, the Magnolia stellata is gorgeous.

Offline Hugh Currin

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #23 on: May 15, 2020, 02:21:21 PM »
Hugh: The hole in the floor did take some thought. However, the design and construction of the hoist had me checking calculations many times. This current move may be a bridge too far, I'm considering downsizing the lathe and mill. But they are both on a trailer and Saturday we dive south.

Andy: I did cut the joists. To build back up I made new joists that rest on the original foundation and center beam. Are these "sister joists"? I bolted these to the original joist stubs, then screwed the original flooring back in place. Quite and adventure.



But I'm too old to ever do that again.

Thanks.
Hugh

Offline awake

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Re: Hugh's blank canvas
« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2020, 07:04:15 PM »
Are these "sister joists"?

I think so - joists that are joined face-to-face with part of an existing joist. Usually I think of the join as being longer than that, but honestly, I'm well beyond any claim to expertise here. More like someone who knows just enough to be very, very dangerous!
Andy