Author Topic: Newcomen Engine  (Read 3405 times)

Offline Tinkerer58

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Newcomen Engine
« on: November 04, 2013, 11:20:07 AM »
I am currently working on drawings to build a model Newcommen, again not all that much information about, I have everything that is available on the net. Being a beginner I'm just going by the seat of my pants and see where I end up. I love jumping in boots and all, I find it the quickest way to learn. I am currently working on a 2" dia cylinder with a 5" stroke. Having problems with pump and valve gear design at the moment, and I'm trying to decide the best way to construct the piston. I'm trying to keep it looking as close as possible in keeping with the look of the era. Obviously I will have to make some allowances for the lack of my expertise, size and modern materials. I also would like it to operate at about the same speed as the originals operated, I have seen the Sussex kit and its way too fast and only depicts the concept and does not capture the real construction of the engine. I am hoping to find a way of also aging the timber work without having to leave it out in the weather for the next five years LOL.
Any recommendations or pump plans that may be adapted and modified, or even some valve gear that would be in keeping with what I'm trying to achieve would all be very helpful. Once I have drawings of any significance I will post them for comment and for anyone who would like to do the build as a challenge.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 08:18:35 PM by b.lindsey »
I just wanna be in me bloody shed.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Newcomen Engine
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2013, 12:03:41 PM »
Tinkerer,
I can't be of much help with the pump or valve gear, and this may not be much help with the weathering since the supplier is in the US and apparently can only ship this product to the 48 contiguous states. But...weathering treatments do exist and I am hoping you may be able to find something similar closer to home or that perhaps one of our members in Australia may have a lead on a similar product there. See the link below:

http://www.micromark.com/Age-It-Easy-Gray-3-1and2-Fl-oz,7567.html

Here, it comes in both a weathered gray and a weathered brown version.

Bill
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 08:18:54 PM by b.lindsey »

Offline peatoluser

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Re: Newcomen Engine
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2013, 12:10:55 PM »
Good luck with the project. I tend to jump in head first as well. it makes for an interesting learning experience if nothing else. I know you have everything of interest that is on the net, but I wonder if you have come across the books by David Hulse?

http://www.davidhulse.co.uk/551/David-Hulse---About-My-Books/

now those models are certainly the bees knees!

peter
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 08:19:06 PM by b.lindsey »

Offline Tinkerer58

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Re: Newcomen Engine
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2013, 10:10:22 PM »
Thank you for the info guys, I'll have to look deeper into that weathering stuff. I love the work of David Hulse I will certainly be using some of his ideas as inspiration but I don't want to go into all the brickwork details but do want to retain it's character of all the timber work. I would say that the engines were built using all the timber frame work and then the engine house was built around it. From my research and observations of the construction it seems that once the engine became a marketable product the brick work was mainly there to support the beam and the rest to keep the engine away from the elements.
So the timber frame work for a model that would also make it easier to build, move and transport, I don't think too many of us would have the skills or patience to go to the extent that David has making all his own brick etc.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 08:19:16 PM by b.lindsey »
I just wanna be in me bloody shed.

Offline Giraldus

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Re: Newcomen Engine
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2013, 07:47:20 PM »
Tinkerer,

good luck for your project - I'll be following really interested. As you know, I like these really old machines.

I just scanned all the pictures I took from the "Lap Engine" copy in "Deutsches Museum Munich". The wood appears often almost as black as the metal parts. Ok, this is a copy, but pictures from the Newcomen engine at the  "Henry Ford Museum" also show black overall appearance.

I think this is due to tar used to preserve the wood.

Wether the overall dark appearance is fine for a model of 1:12 oder 1:15 is a matter of taste IMHO.

Greetings

Gerd

P.S.: Can you eventually edit the Subject ? It's Newcomen.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 08:19:28 PM by b.lindsey »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Newcomen Engine
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2013, 08:19:50 PM »
Subject line modified...

Bill

Offline Alan Haisley

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Re: Newcomen Engine
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2013, 10:01:37 PM »
Model railroad books on scenery can have good weathering information. A couple ideas from them: A hacksaw blade used as a scraper can help simulate weathered wood grain; A wash with dilute India ink can exaggerate the grain and aid in weathering. There are lots of ideas like this but most leave it up to the individual modeler to get the look he or she wants.
Alan
Near Raleigh, NC, USA

Offline Tinkerer58

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Re: Newcomen Engine
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2013, 10:14:09 PM »
Thank you for all the suggestions, it gives me plenty of research to do.
The valve gear and trip arms including timing are going to be my most challenging items I think, but when I come back from my holidays I'll be taking a trip to our Power House Museum as the have an engine there with similar style of valve gear on it, I'll have to see if I can draw some inspiration from that.
I just wanna be in me bloody shed.