Author Topic: Anyone else try this  (Read 2776 times)

Offline Doc

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Anyone else try this
« on: October 26, 2013, 11:02:34 PM »
I was just curious if anyone can tell me what happens if you forget to hook up the ground wire while powder coating and if they found their part after and how far away was it!  :lolb: :lolb: :lolb:
I'm doing a job for a friend putting in hand controls and I decided to powder coat some of the parts well I forgot to hook up the ground wire and was holding the part like I have done before and then it happened   :zap: next thing I knew I was looking for the part I had thrown it out in the yard (was doing this out on the deck). Man it gives you a healthy jolt! Wont be doing that again anytime real soon (famous last words).
 I chuckle about it now but glad no one was standing close by may have been it the line of fire. :lolb:

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Anyone else try this
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2013, 12:47:08 AM »
Thanks for sharing Doc...happy it wasn't worse.  I doubt you will forget that ground wire next time!!

Bill
« Last Edit: October 27, 2013, 01:44:58 PM by b.lindsey »

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Anyone else try this
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2013, 01:27:25 PM »
An interesting aside to the powder paint story---Volkswagen of Canada had an alloy wheel plant in Ontario, Canada. All of the aluminum cast and cnc machined wheels were powder coated with clearcoat powder paint. It was far too time consuming to mask off the wheel nut sockets, so they asked me to design a vacuum gun to suck the powder out of the wheel nut sockets before the wheels went thru the big oven that melted and "set" the powder paint. (If painted, the paint eventually compresses and the wheel nuts come loose, a big liability issue.) I designed some of the strangest looking "guns" that you ever seen. They had a pistol grip, a 12" long barrel that fit into the center of the wheel, and a big starfish shaped attachment on the barrel, near the grip that had either 4 or 5 (depending on which wheel it was being used on) hollow barrels that had ends shaped to fit into the wheel nut pockets, with a series of holes all around the end, attached to the outer end/faces of the starfish arms. There was an air passage thru the pistol grip, out thru each arms of the starfish shaped piece, and down the secondary barrels to the ends which fitted into the nut pockets. There was a connection on the bottom of the pistol grip that was attached to a very powerful vacuum system. The wheels were hung on hooks on a moving conveyor to go thru the heating oven, and some poor operator had to stand there all day wielding that vacuum to clean the powder off the wheels. It was said that at the end of a year wielding the vacuum gun, these operators made a lot of money betting on their prowess at "arm wrestling" other members on the plant floor, and I don't doubt it a bit!!!

Offline Doc

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Re: Anyone else try this
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2013, 08:15:17 PM »
I can kind of relate to that. Back in the beginning of my career I ran a machine called hydrotel  3 spindle 35 horse and some of the tools manually loaded were 30 to 40 lbs. That was back when we were working on Towcobra and the cruse missile parts and bru 32. Some of the parts also were when loaded on the machine weighted 180 lbs and when you took them off they weighed 15 lbs. Needless to say the operators that ran these machines had to be of the larger (lets say) size.