Author Topic: Fowler BB1 in 2"  (Read 82067 times)

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2013, 08:42:34 PM »
Jason, being somewhat new to the steam world and all that it is in your neck of the woods, I was quite unaware of this. I now must look for some type of video demo :cheers: see while I was posting tvoght had the same thoughts . Thanks t

Whiskey

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2013, 08:51:27 PM »

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2013, 09:02:02 PM »
Well By God Virgil, I ain't never. Like a big donkey with wheels, no, two donkeys with wheels.  :lolb:
Thanks Jason

Whiskey

Offline Maryak

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2013, 11:52:14 PM »
Jo,

If you would like to post the offending step file that won't assemble maybe we could figure out why.

Best Regards
Bob
Если вы у Тетушки были яйца, она была бы Дядюшкой

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #19 on: October 02, 2013, 12:30:09 AM »
When I was a young boy, back when dinosaurs still roamed the earth, the local sawmill was driven by a big steam traction engine that looked remarkably similar to the one in the very first post of this thread. It was owned by a Mr. Stapely, and every morning at 7:00 you could hear the whistle blow to signal "starting time" at the sawmill. An old man named Arthur Jones lived rent free in a little house in the mill yard, and he paid to stay there by getting up every morning at 4:00 A.M. and firing the boiler with a fresh load of slabs to make sure the steam was up by 7:00. Everybody dreaded hearing 3 blasts on the whistle during the day, because that signalled an accident at the mill, and there were some pretty damned gruesome accidents. My dad was a lumberjack, who would be away from home in the logging camps all winter, until the ice went out in April, and the logs were driven down the lakes and rivers to either Jim Browns water powered mill, or trucked to Stapeley's mill. Dad would come out of the camps, go on a two week "bender" with a bunch of my uncles, then work at one of the mills until about mid August when all the logs were sawn. Then stay home and draw "pogey" until hunting season, butcher our hog, shoot a white tailed deer, and then be gone back to the logging camps for another winter. This was a pretty typical way of life in rural Ontario  in the early 1950's.

Offline Don1966

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2013, 02:39:59 AM »
I am glad to see the video of these traction engines working. I can see why using cables between traction engine to plough with. I guess they were a bit to large and heavy to go row to row.
The way I grew up we had mules to pull the plough with and I did a lot of walking behind that plough. We were not wealthy enough to own a traction engine so I guess this is why I had never see one in action.
Years later my father bought a second hand John Deere tractor of which he stayed on while we walked behind the mule. Thanks for link.

Don

Offline Jo

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2013, 07:45:34 AM »
We do more than just plough fields with Steam Ploughs ;D.

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #22 on: October 02, 2013, 07:59:15 AM »
One advantage of the cable method is that the heavy engines do not compact the ground. The method does suit larger more open fields which probably are still classed as small by US standards.

Though the sideways pull can have its disadvantages on soft ground


Offline Pete49

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2013, 04:12:37 AM »
About 5 years ago I went to a steam and old engine show that's run every year at Orroroo in Sth Aust and watched 2 traction engines demo how they used to dig dams here and then they also did a ploughing  demo. Great to watch. Probably go again next year as I find a 5 year or so break tends to show new stuff that's been refurbished and running.
Pete
I used to have a friend.....but the rope broke and he ran away :(

Offline tel

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #24 on: October 03, 2013, 09:58:13 AM »
 ;D I last attended Orroroo in 1986, so I'm well overdue!
The older I get, the better I was.
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Offline ProdEng

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2013, 11:18:34 AM »
BB surely stands for Beautiful Beast  :ThumbsUp: Look forward to seeing parts being made for this epic project Jo.
Jan in Perth

Offline Steam Haulage

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #26 on: October 03, 2013, 02:42:19 PM »
Just a quick question.
On all the videos of steam ploughing the cable gets wound onto the drum very neatly, it seems well under control. Shown is a 'jockey' wheel which moves up and down. Does anyone have any idea how this guidance system works?
Unless of course every cable is the same diameter and the guide moves a constant amount for each turn of the drum.

I'll be glad to know.

JerryNotts
Dogs look up to you, cats look down on you, pigs treat you as equal.

Offline Jo

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #27 on: October 03, 2013, 02:46:49 PM »
Jerry it is one of those little items I will be designing shortly (or it might be longly  :LittleDevil:)

In the meantime...

Jo
« Last Edit: October 03, 2013, 03:00:46 PM by Jo »
Usus est optimum magister

Offline Alan Haisley

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #28 on: October 03, 2013, 07:22:31 PM »
Jo,
Engines are made for work - move air, move water, pull cables, move boats, move wheels.
Regardless, modeling a machine shows techniques of fabricating all of the "fiddly bits", whether part of a engine or part of what it works with.
Learning how to make "fiddly bits" is what I look forward to seeing - and I'm looking forward to seeing a lot of them in this build  :atcomputer:
Alan
Near Raleigh, NC, USA

Offline Steam Haulage

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Re: Fowler BB1 in 2"
« Reply #29 on: October 03, 2013, 08:23:29 PM »
Thank you Jo,

I could say obvious really, but that we be a distortion of the truth. Even with the description in front of me I shall have to spend some time puzzling before I really understand.

When I was in primary school (1950s) my father ran a fleet of Ruston Bucyrus rope operated  excavators, these were some of the biggest in England at that time. He tried to explain how the winding gear worked but I was too in awe and perhaps a little frightened of the ginormous Perkins diesel  and the rattling of the steel cabin. I did however learn how the wartime runways had been built and how weak the concrete was. No rebar then.

JerryNotts
Dogs look up to you, cats look down on you, pigs treat you as equal.