Author Topic: 16 pole 4 phase model generator.  (Read 7879 times)

Offline old-and-broken

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 42
  • Near Houston, TX
Re: 16 pole 4 phase model generator.
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2014, 04:52:44 PM »
This was my idea of winding.  16 stator windings grouped 4 in a series with twelve magnet poles.


A journey of 1000 miles begins with the first step.

Offline Don1966

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5993
  • Morgan City, LA (Along the Gulf Coast)
Re: 16 pole 4 phase model generator.
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2014, 05:06:54 PM »
I can see it now and looks like you have done your homework also. The magnet oreitations are a nice touch. I need to study the magnet setup a little closer thought.
Are you just going to rectifier the AC to use?


Don
« Last Edit: January 05, 2014, 05:18:55 PM by Don1966 »

Offline Baron

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 137
  • Grumpy Old Git !
Re: 16 pole 4 phase model generator.
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2014, 05:57:56 PM »
Depending on the voltage generated and the power produced it could make a battery charger or with a suitable transformer step the voltage up to 110/120.  Stick the fan blade back on for a wind generator.  Now that's green ;-)

Best Regards:  Baron.

I donít regret the things Iíve done, I regret the things I didnít do when I had the chance.

Offline old-and-broken

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 42
  • Near Houston, TX
Re: 16 pole 4 phase model generator.
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2014, 06:22:04 PM »
To be honest,  I did have the idea of putting the box fan back together and putting it all on the top of a tall pole in the back yard.   Should be able to produce enough current to charge some NiMH batteries and maybe use them for some outdoor cement pathway lighting.  When the wind blows that is. 
A journey of 1000 miles begins with the first step.

Offline airmodel

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 79
Re: 16 pole 4 phase model generator.
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2014, 11:46:56 PM »
Very interesting project! I have made many model generators but have never rewound stators.

Offline PStechPaul

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 688
  • Cockeysville, MD 21030
Re: 16 pole 4 phase model generator.
« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2014, 09:48:55 PM »
How is this project coming along? I think I see how the magnets and stator pole pairs work. At the point shown in your sketch, the N pole 1 is aligned with stator pole 1, S pole 4 with stator 5, N7 with stator 9, and S10 with stator 14, so you will get a voltage peak on the black winding (A) at this point (0 degrees).
 
Then there will be N3, S6, N9, S12 for a peak on the green winding (B).
 
Then S2, N5, S8, N11 for a peak on the blue winding (C).
 
Then N1, S4, N7, S10 for a peak on the red winding (D)
 
That would be 1/16 of a revolution, or 22.5 degrees. At this point the next sequence would be:
 
S12, N3, S6, N9 for a reverse peak on winding A. If I have understood this correctly, there will be four positive transitions followed by four negative transitions for each 1/4 turn, and four complete cycles per revolution.
 
I don't have much experience with generators, but with induction motors the winding pattern is much different, and usually there is overlap with belts that span at least three stator pole pieces, at least for three phase motors. The stators I have worked with have had 24 and 36 slots, and the maximum number of pole (pairs) would be 8 or 12. I rewound a couple of single phase motors for three phase, with much heavier wire, for a voltage of about 8 VAC, and then I used a VFD and step-down transformer to apply 240 Hz, at which point the 12 pole 600 RPM motor spun at 2400 RPM. It looked like this:
 

 
I actually made my own crude solid state three phase drive and was able to spin the motor using a 12V battery. But the MOSFETs were not properly rated and they released their "magic smoke".