Author Topic: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp  (Read 16765 times)

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2013, 02:31:14 AM »
..."Don't forget your fire extinguisher"..........  yes indeed, if you can find it  :lolb: :lolb: :lolb:


We all know you will get things in order anon, and be back at the MEM Corliss in no time.


BC1
Jim

Offline Jim K 324

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2013, 03:07:41 AM »

                :whoohoo: Looking great Arnold , I found out that no matter how big my  shop is I am running out
                                  space , good point Marv , a few weeks ago I was vacuming swarft from the lathe and
                                 forgot the shop stool was behind me and I backed into it and lost my balance fell backwards
                                 tried to grab something to break the fall and ripped my arm on the mill from the elbow to
                                my hand had a bloody mess for awhile, So move those stools out of the way guys!!
                                 
It's not what you make,It's how you make it that
matters !!

Online Kim

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2013, 03:32:42 AM »
Its looking great Arnold!  I like your new bench too!  Lots of uncluttered space to clutter up making things! :)

I've just been through this recently - I spent a month cleaning up my shop and it looks great now!  Unfortunately, that cleaning streak has extended into some of the rooms inside the house that need a overhaul too, so I'm spending some time digging those out, which is keeping me out of my shop for a bit.  But I'll be back out there in due time.  And like you, we'll both get to enjoy the fruits of our cleaning labor!

Kim

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2013, 03:34:08 AM »
Thanks all who replied  :praise2:

Stan, I'm starting to acquire more smallish woodworking machinery, so don't get rid of too much.  I don't particularly like woodwork, but some bits are handy to have for making bases for models, as well as renovations around the house...

Quote
This isn't directed at you, Arnold.  I'm just exploiting your thread to alert others about a safety concern.
You're most welcome Marv.  Things was starting to get to the point where tripping and falling could be an issue. I never leave machines running when stepping away from them, but it would be all-too-easy to trip up and bang into something sharp.

Jim, I didn't know Scots produced energy drinks  >:D  You'll have to wait for the nefarious project though; I'm already breaking my own rules by pausing one project (the Corliss) to do another one (sorting out the shop).  I have a bad habit of not finishing anything if I don't do it from start to finish, but the shop couldn't wait any longer.  After that, it's back to the Corliss, and then we'll see what gets done next.

Bob, go for it...  I was hoping for coolish spring weather, but here it jumped from mid-teen to mid-thirty oC daytime temperatures in two days flat last weekend...  Seems like we're skipping spring and going straight on to summer  :facepalm2:  Don't know how it's going to turn out down under...

Jo, that vehicle is an "engine build" in progress - albeit full-size.  I had to take it out of the shop to get the mill in, but once this revamp is done, I should have space to add a 1m lathe, hydraulic press, sheet bender, slip rolls and some other bits into the shop, and still get a vehicle in there with a minimum of fuss as well if needed.  I'd just have to move the T+C grinder out of the way.  And there's a reason I want to be able to get a vehicle in there...  It makes unloading heavy machinery a LOT easier if I can get it in there under the I-beam and chain hoist  :LittleDevil:

Quote
If I try to organize things then I forget where I put them.
  Vince, I have that same problem, but it's reached the point where I can't find them even if I know where I put them  :facepalm2:  There's nothing left to lose now...

Dave, at least you get MUCH more done than me while sorting out things; my hat's off to you  :NotWorthy:

Quote
Don't forget your fire extinguisher!
NEVER! - those are bits of kit that I know exactly where they're at - the shop one is mounted right next to that used-to-be-badly-wired light switch.  In fact, it's easier to reach the extinguisher than the switch when entering the shop!  Another one in the kitchen on top of the fridge; easy as getting a cold beer to get to that one.  And one in each of the cars  ;)

From everybody's responses, it's really good to know I'm not the only who get the shop in a horrible state, and that it's in fact a global problem  :)

As for the small drill press and getting more than I wanted:  I nipped off some time from "Work" work today and collected the lot. 
When I went to look at the drill press just over three weeks ago, it turned out that there was a selection of power tools available for sale - either in bits or as a job-lot.  There were some bits missing (nothing I could not make easily in my shop or buy cheaply), and the tools showed very little signs of actual use, so I put in a separate offer each on the drill press, an industrial quality battery powered hand drill, and a small mitre-saw at very low, but still reasonable, price.  I wasn't particularly interested in the  hammer drill and jigsaw that completed the job-lot (already have slightly better versions of those), so added N$50 (about US$ 5)  to the total of the other offers for the job-lot.  My offer (N$2450.00 / US$ 245.00) was accepted for the job-lot  :) :

I do have work for the items I put in individual bids on, but I don't know what to do with the extra jigsaw and drill...  I think I'll keep them around to borrow out to neighbours and friends as needed.

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline peatoluser

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2013, 03:01:34 PM »
Blimey! and I thought trying to fit out a 8 by 6 shed was a big enough task! my sympathies I know what your going through. No matter how long I spend trying to sort things out, I seem to be permanently stuck at the one quarter through the task point. I believe there's light at the end of the tunnel - it's just trying to find the bl**dy entrance is the hard part!

peter

Offline jwcnc1911

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2013, 04:40:47 PM »
I'm having serious envy issues over that workbench!
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JW

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2013, 06:50:17 PM »
Arnold, don't worry, it's a bachelor thing. What you need is a nice young sweet thing there to whip things into shape ( it's give and take you know, well, maybe you don't) . Now, that jig saw. If a man could knock himself a table up with the saw mounted from underneath and a slot in the "table" for just the blade to poke through, I bet it would cut a whole lot of our little fiddly bits. Maybe an over arm with a foot and guide bearings. If it's variable speed even the better. I bet a fellow could even adapt some needle files and have a mini die filer.

Whiskey

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #22 on: September 22, 2013, 06:04:12 PM »
Cheers Peter - I'm making headway, but much slower than anticipated.  At least there is light at the end of tunnel; I'm starting to get to bits of my shop I haven't seen for many years!

JW, the new workbench is already all cluttered up again  :Lol: - hopefully it'll be usable in future.

Eric, I'd be happy to have a nice young sweet thing around - that's currently a work in progress  ;) .  I also thought about modifying the jig saw, but it's not a variable speed, and much too fast for that kind of use.  So I'll keep it around as a spare; one of my upcoming tooling projects will be a small die filer, and one other bit of kit I'm keeping my eyes peeled for is a small scroll saw  :)

Some might have noticed that I've been very quiet of late on the forum.  Work commitments played a big role, and to cap things, my sister and brand spanking new brother-in-law pitched on a visit, so there was much entertaining to do...

With all the crud involved, things required quite a bit of moving around to sort out; here I'd moved a lot of stuff to the "clean" section of the shop and sorted out all my stock in piles:


Panning left from the last photo, one can actually see the shop floor; the space between the closer table and steel workbench with the vise on it was completely covered with boxes full of stuff.  Just for Zee and Jim - the fire extinguisher is visible hanging next to the door and close to where I normally work with gas torches and do welding  ;) :


The band saw sprouted a set of wheels, and some lifters below the feet on the other side to keep it level.  Still some paint required - but I needed to move it around:

 :( There's a nasty crack in the floor; I'll have to look into how to fix that a bit...

With most of the floor space sorted (and room to move in!), I need a LOT more shelving and drawer space.  A bunch of the old computers I chucked out had nice covers that looked like they could be made into storage space for abrasive paper..., so I spent some time with a drill and pop-rivet gun, added a bit of wood at the back to add some rigidity, and the result is a nice little rack.  Not pretty, but functional:


Two sections of the wood shelving I bought and some other odds 'n ends were cut up to minimize wastage, and cobbled together to make a fairly sturdy rack from:


That ended up getting bolted to the wall between the lathe and the mill, after moving away the old V6 engine that's been lying in the way there for about 5 years.  The rack is level; it's the blokes who mounted the trunking before I bought the house that did such an "excellent" job  ::) .  I have two doors (recycled single bed headboards  :Lol: ) to mount to the rack, but I have to shop for some suitable hinges first; I wasn't in the mood to make my own:


My ER11 collets have been standing around in the small individual boxes I bought them in; that's been a serious PITA, as they tend to easily get lost, and it's difficult to get the right size one.  So I spent a bit of time to make a case for them from some off-cut pine wood.  Yes, I  know...  Woodwork on the mill  :-X ...  At least it was fun to twiddle the wheels for a change instead of sweeping, carting and dusting  :) :




Some more recycling...  I do like cooking, and use a fair amount of olive oil.  My favourite brand comes in nice metal tins, and I've been collecting those over the years as well.  Some time with a can opener, and there's a bunch of tins for storing larger fasteners in a much more organized fashion than I have done in the past:


Still lots of sorting out left to do.  I want to build a small cabinet with some drawers to house the small lathe's accessories.  From my original full set of ER25 collets (all also still in separate little plastic containers) the ER25 collection has grown and now features additional ones in sizes regularly used on the mill, as well as a full higher-precision set.  All those need suitable organized storage.

At least there's progress; I'm itching to get back to work on engines, and it will be much nicer to do once all this is sorted out  :)

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline DaveH

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #23 on: September 22, 2013, 07:24:39 PM »
And if she gets interested in making model engines promise you will buy her her own lathe. Sharing a lathe  :ShakeHead:
Jo

A lass from Namibia interested in model engines  :lolb: :lolb: :lolb:
 :cheers:
DaveH

Online mklotz

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #24 on: September 22, 2013, 10:25:27 PM »

Eric, I'd be happy to have a nice young sweet thing around - that's currently a work in progress  ;) ...Kind regards, Arnold
Just remember the short term time lost from the workshop for the courting is more than made up for in the long term

Yes, in the long term ALL your workshop time will be lost attending to all her silly requirements and honey-dos.
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Regards, Marv


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Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2013, 01:05:35 AM »
You are so right Marv. It's well known here that Sunday is my and DOG's day in the shed. Today it only took four trips back to the house to take care of those " can you come here a minute, it won't take but a second" projects. But hey, the shed is nice and neat, she emptied all the trash cans and help sweep the floor. I even heard her practicing saying "swarf". It's all a trade off. Just don't plan on coming out on top :lolb:

Whiskey

Offline Maryak

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2013, 04:06:28 AM »
You could try being very brave or as most would say very foolish.

"Yes Dear," and then carry on with what YOU were doing. Works a treat for about 10 nanoseconds.  :o

Best Regards
Bob
Если вы у Тетушки были яйца, она была бы Дядюшкой

Online propforward

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #27 on: September 23, 2013, 04:42:55 PM »
Romantic problems aside, Arnold I really like what you are doing with your shoppe. Some really good organisation going on there - very nice indeed. I especially like the wooden collet boxes.
Stuart

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2013, 06:42:21 PM »
 :lolb: Some of you might just put me off chasing lasses !

There's actually some lasses around who express more interest in my engines than most males...  It must be said though that it only extends to the really shiny ones  ;)

Thanks Prop - that collet box was just a "quickie" to sort out things a bit.  At some point I'll spend a bit of time with quality wood and make nicer ones.  I want to use it as-is for now to see how it works out and what I'd like to change.  It's more fun to use tools that's practically arranged in nice-to-handle-and-use storage.

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Online propforward

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #29 on: September 23, 2013, 08:22:21 PM »

There's actually some lasses around who express more interest in my engines than most males...

It's a trap. Be very careful.  :paranoia:
Stuart