Author Topic: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp  (Read 16599 times)

Offline arnoldb

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Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« on: September 09, 2013, 09:28:44 PM »
Some of you have seen what my shop looked like when I started off in the hobby about four years ago.  There wasn't much; a lathe, drill press and band saw made up the major bits of tooling, and the bench grinder was invaluable in helping shape and sharpen toolbits.  I had some other electric hand tools, a small compressor and a minimum in terms of files, taps, dies and measuring equipment.  Yet, this was enough to let me build my first five engines.  Oh, and I'm extremely untidy  :embarassed: :






Times were hard and money was tight, but I needed some storage space.  A neighbour was loading up a trailer to take stuff to the tip, and on top was some pine planking which I happily took off again and cobbled together some shelving for storing the goodies I'd started accumulating and making for the lathe:

Marv always points out, and quite rightly so, that it's a bad idea to store items above and behind a lathe on a shelf.  I make a point of it not to put anything on that shelf that I might need while the lathe is in operation.  That shelf is reserved for the lathe chucks, collets and other accessories that nobody in their right mind would change while the lathe is running.  Cutting oil and the files I use while the lathe is in operation is always kept in the front in the coolant tray so that I don't have to reach over to get at it.

I wanted a mill, and after saving up for more than a year and a slight windfall, I was finally able to buy it.  The old pickup truck was taken out of the garage, and the mill moved in next to the lathe after a frantic session of building a stand for it:


The Myford lathe is the star in my shop; I absolutely adore working with her.  Yes, "her" - she's a fine lady with some quirks that need to be kept in mind, but she's done everything I've asked of her at limits and accuracy I never would have thought possible a couple of years ago.  As much as I love the Myford, a lot of small repetitive tasks crop up in model engineering, and like on any lathe, this quickly causes more wear on the ways close to the chuck.  I want to keep my old girl (she's about 43 this year) around for a long time, so to lighten her load I bought an additional small lathe for the small jobs just over two years ago:


All the while, I'd been getting and making more tooling for the shop.  And space was running out; the new lathe didn't have a place to mount it properly, so it was not used for its intended purpose and have been standing idle for two years...  I'd acquired the tool & cutter grinder quite a while ago, but it was in South Africa, and there was problems with logistics to get it here, so it only arrived a couple of months ago.

I hadn't had any leave for over two years due to changing employment and having to meet project targets, so two months ago when my boss told me I'd better take leave otherwise I'd start losing my leave days, and projects were a bit quiet, I jumped at the opportunity.  The first week was spent sorting out personal stuff, sleeping in a lot and even watching some telly...  Then a week to visit my parents and grandparents in South Africa; a 1800 km (about 1125 miles) trip each way, it was a long drive, but I had a lot of fun driving and pushing my Golf to some "not to be mentioned" limits  >:D

As mentioned, I'm really running out of workspace and storage space in the shop - Here is what things looked like last Monday - hold on to your chairs; it's really ugly.  It's surprising that I've been getting anything done in there and it was time to sort it out:




With the chaos, there was a limited amount of space to move around, so I started by clearing out a strip at the far side of the shop, and got the T+C grinder off the trolley it was standing on; it does have wheels, but they are small and not suited to long distances of movement.  This was the easiest part of the shop operations for the week... I'd already removed the straps I'd used to lift the machine in this photo:


I went on a shopping spree as well.  I'd saved up a bit of money for the shop revamp, but material is horribly expensive here in Namibia as it's all imported.  I must admit I really envy seeing other people's shops with lots of fine wooden cabinets and drawers.  If I could do that, it would be horribly expensive, but with a limited budget I had to spend on practicality rather than looks. So, I made a couple of salesmen happy at various suppliers, buying in a couple of lengths of heavy duty angle iron, a length of counter top as well as a handful of sheets of pressed-wood planks and some hard-board, and a bunch of electrical stuff.  The timber supplier was the first to deliver:


After receiving the angle iron, I broke out the big angle grinder to start cutting things up after some careful calculations to get the most from the material.  I'd have preferred to use the bandsaw for this, but it's stuck in it's place in the shop, and there was no way I could get the material to it to saw up.  Maybe I'm just a wimp, but using the big grinder is hard and potentially very dangerous work, so I steer clear of it unless I have to use it like here...:


Next there followed a lot of welding.  Inside the shop.  I was working alone, so carrying heavy bits of steel around didn't seem like much fun, so I made things as close as possible to final location:

I'd also drilled and counter-sunk holes int it to fasten the counter top on.

I slapped some paint on it with a brush...  I don't like painting, but one must do what needs dictate:

 :facepalm2: Unfortunately I welded the middle leg to the wrong side and I only saw that after painting :Lol:.  That meant I had to carry the lot out of the shop, turn it around and carry it back in after the paint dried. 

Finally, it was in place and fitted with the counter top.  Like I said, I'm a wimp, and a 3600x600x30mm  counter top is damn heavy to handle alone!  One NEVER have enough plugs (outlets for the US folk), and that's one area I didn't scrimp at.  I added four additional 2-way outlets; three above the new workbench, and one close to where the T+C grinder and compressor will stand.  Rather than connect these new plugs to the existing plug circuit, I added a new circuit for them to the distribution board on a separate circuit breaker.  I like a lot of light in my workspace, and added two more 6' lights - one suspended from the rafters at a position where it would add suitable lighting to the "dark" side of my mill that's been irritating me, for the position the small lathe would occupy on the new bench, as well as minimize shadows while I work on the machines.  Here things are partly done; the suspended light is in place and all the work on the plugs complete:


The new lights didn't need a new circuit, so I set about wiring them into the existing one, so that all the shop lighting would work off one switch.  That caused me to discover a horror...  The wiring to the existing lights were done in a very shoddy way.  After closer investigation, I even found that the moron who did it used earth coded wires as live wires  :zap: :


The wiring as it was at the side-entrance door light switch - it's wired together with one between the two roll-up doors so that either can switch the lighting:


 :hellno: Wrong wire colour, an exposed section of live wire at one connector, and a sand dune! - I ended up going through ALL of the electrical points in the shop, stringing additional properly coded wire where needed and checked and fixed all connections not only to local code, but to my own higher standard and cleaning out the dunes.  I might be untidy in general, but when it comes to wiring and cabling I'm a royal pain in the @ss about doing a neat and proper job - as has been often told me by apprentices  :Lol: .
Sorting out the shop electrics took quite a while - time I hadn't budgeted on spending, but at least I now know I won't have issues with this in future.

After sorting out the electrical issues, I added a storage shelf above the new workbench, in a position where I wouldn't bump my noggin against it all the time while working there, but low enough to reach without a ladder.  I plonked the small lathe down in it's approximate mounting position as well:


That's where I stopped photos for a while; it shows about a sixth of the shop sorted. 

In the meantime, I'd chucked out about 10 old computers, a box full of computer mouses (mice?), more than a box full of old computer keyboards, a LOT of electrical and electronics stuff that's now "antiquated" and haven't been used in the last ten plus years - but was hoarded up that it might be useful "some day".  The vertical band saw got a new stand that is now mobile so I can push it around as needed.  I found a set of wheels amongst the hoarded treasures junk that I can fit to the horizontal saw to make moving it around a lot more practical.

There's still a lot left to do; I thought a week would be more than enough to sort out the shop, but I've barely scratched the surface.  Its much more work than I thought, but hopefully when done, I'll have a more practical working space.

... Then there's the little matter about me looking around for a while for a small second-hand drill press to treat "as a set of castings" for a nefarious project...  That opportunity arrived about three weeks ago, but I got a bit more than I actually intended  :-X

I'll post another update once the shop is sorted a bit more; it's in turmoil at the moment and you've had more than enough good examples of bad examples  ;)

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline sshire

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2013, 09:48:16 PM »
Great start! I agree on the wiring. It MUST be done correctly.
I'm seriously thinking of selling much of the woodworking machinery to gain space. I haven't used it since I started this chip making.
Best,
Stan

Offline mklotz

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2013, 09:52:01 PM »
Looking very good, Arnold.  For me here in LaLa land, Namibia is high on the exotic list so it's reassuring to see that shops there end up looking remarkably similar to that with which I am familiar.

Quote
Marv always points out, and quite rightly so, that it's a bad idea to store items above and behind a lathe on a shelf.  I make a point of it not to put anything on that shelf that I might need while the lathe is in operation.  That shelf is reserved for the lathe chucks, collets and other accessories that nobody in their right mind would change while the lathe is running.  Cutting oil and the files I use while the lathe is in operation is always kept in the front in the coolant tray so that I don't have to reach over to get at it.

Your reference to my safety nagging reminded me of another oft-ignored point I wanted to emphasize for the safety of all.

Don't put stuff that could trip or snag a bit of clothing and cause a trip near the base of the lathe or mill.  It's too easy to walk away from a running machine for a moment to grab a tool, come back, trip, and reach out and grab a spinning workpiece or tool to catch one's fall.

This isn't directed at you, Arnold.  I'm just exploiting your thread to alert others about a safety concern.
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Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2013, 01:41:32 AM »
Wow! Arnold, you gotsta lay off those energy drinks  :Lol:  Your shop doesn't look any more cluttered, well uh, disorganized, *ahem*, oh, OK, messy, as any of the rest of our shops has been at one time or another.  :help:  Gees, I just came from downstairs and mine literally looks like a bomb had been detonated in it and I have not done any chip making since I don't know when.


I really like your new bench, looks a treat and appears to be sturdy. Being an electrician/phoneman myself, I can certainly relate to your desire to have all power conductors in code and of proper color. When I go and do a friend a favor by adding a circuit or rerouting an existing one, I find it amazing some of the garbage work that had been done prior and I always ask the rhetorical question of the owner, "So. How do you suppose that electrical house-fires get started? To which the owners usually plead ignorance and shuffle off with their heads down and grumbling.


I can't wait to see and hear about the nefarious project you mentioned.


regards


BC1
Jim

Offline Maryak

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2013, 04:05:26 AM »
I have been promising a cleanup for a while now and with spring upon us, I've run out of excuses.

Thanks for the inspiration Arnold.

Best Regards
Bob
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Offline swilliams

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2013, 07:23:38 AM »
Looks great Arnold

Clutter and mess is like swarf, it's what you get when you build stuff!

Steve

Offline tel

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2013, 10:19:53 AM »
Clutter and mess? Compared to my workshop it is pristine! :old:
The older I get, the better I was.
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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2013, 12:18:18 PM »
Looking good Arnold. One sixth down and five sixths to go but your will get there. I wouldn't even have the gumption to show my little corner of the garage at the moment :)

Bill

Offline ths

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2013, 01:30:38 PM »
I have a corner of my partners art studio. I'm a disgrace! You have nothing to worry about, apart from normality!

Cheers, Hugh.

Offline Jo

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2013, 02:00:09 PM »
And someone was telling me my workshop was untidy when he visited last.  :LittleDevil:

Go for it Arnold, if you find more space you will have to fill it with more machines  :ThumbsUp:

I was a little concerned  :o to see that vehicle taking up valuable machine space or do you have a fold out work bench to go there and really it is a ploy to make sure you have assembly space when needed?

Looks like a good collection of SWAG (Stuff Which All Gather  :embarassed:), with lots of potential to make model engines just waiting to be discovered.

Jo
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Offline vcutajar

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2013, 04:23:04 PM »
Now why do those photos remind of my garage??!!

If I try to organize things then I forget where I put them.

Vince

Online steamer

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2013, 04:26:49 PM »
Yup....mine is about the same Arnold.....and Yes...i'm working on it....a bit at at time....

Dave
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Offline Mosey

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2013, 04:54:51 PM »
I'm no different than everyone else when it comes to messy, but I've seen some shops here that look like a dream. How about showing us the beautiful, clean, organized ones?  :stir: :stir:
Mosey

Offline KB

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2013, 08:56:50 PM »

Quote
hold on to your chairs; it's really ugly

I looked at the first photo, "hey, that's not so bad" but that second one, whoa!

That's pretty bad, but whose isn't. I've got so many jobs going on right now, doing a major basement renovation, with two little kids, there just isn't time to put anything away...
Speaking of wiring, I have rewired 90% of my home and the due to the horrors I opened up as I went along. I too am a big fan of going well above code.

It's looking really good and I am sure you must feel great about how far it has come and where you will end up. Sometimes I go to the shop to try and sneak a little time in on my current project and the disarray is just so demotivating. Thanks for the inspiration.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2013, 09:22:07 PM »
Looking great Arnold.
I do believe that goes against your self described laziness.

Unlike an engine (though a long project it can be), fitting out, organizing, and in general nesting one's workshop is a never ending project.
Just as well right?!

Don't forget your fire extinguisher!
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Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2013, 02:31:14 AM »
..."Don't forget your fire extinguisher"..........  yes indeed, if you can find it  :lolb: :lolb: :lolb:


We all know you will get things in order anon, and be back at the MEM Corliss in no time.


BC1
Jim

Offline Jim K 324

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2013, 03:07:41 AM »

                :whoohoo: Looking great Arnold , I found out that no matter how big my  shop is I am running out
                                  space , good point Marv , a few weeks ago I was vacuming swarft from the lathe and
                                 forgot the shop stool was behind me and I backed into it and lost my balance fell backwards
                                 tried to grab something to break the fall and ripped my arm on the mill from the elbow to
                                my hand had a bloody mess for awhile, So move those stools out of the way guys!!
                                 
It's not what you make,It's how you make it that
matters !!

Offline Kim

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2013, 03:32:42 AM »
Its looking great Arnold!  I like your new bench too!  Lots of uncluttered space to clutter up making things! :)

I've just been through this recently - I spent a month cleaning up my shop and it looks great now!  Unfortunately, that cleaning streak has extended into some of the rooms inside the house that need a overhaul too, so I'm spending some time digging those out, which is keeping me out of my shop for a bit.  But I'll be back out there in due time.  And like you, we'll both get to enjoy the fruits of our cleaning labor!

Kim

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2013, 03:34:08 AM »
Thanks all who replied  :praise2:

Stan, I'm starting to acquire more smallish woodworking machinery, so don't get rid of too much.  I don't particularly like woodwork, but some bits are handy to have for making bases for models, as well as renovations around the house...

Quote
This isn't directed at you, Arnold.  I'm just exploiting your thread to alert others about a safety concern.
You're most welcome Marv.  Things was starting to get to the point where tripping and falling could be an issue. I never leave machines running when stepping away from them, but it would be all-too-easy to trip up and bang into something sharp.

Jim, I didn't know Scots produced energy drinks  >:D  You'll have to wait for the nefarious project though; I'm already breaking my own rules by pausing one project (the Corliss) to do another one (sorting out the shop).  I have a bad habit of not finishing anything if I don't do it from start to finish, but the shop couldn't wait any longer.  After that, it's back to the Corliss, and then we'll see what gets done next.

Bob, go for it...  I was hoping for coolish spring weather, but here it jumped from mid-teen to mid-thirty oC daytime temperatures in two days flat last weekend...  Seems like we're skipping spring and going straight on to summer  :facepalm2:  Don't know how it's going to turn out down under...

Jo, that vehicle is an "engine build" in progress - albeit full-size.  I had to take it out of the shop to get the mill in, but once this revamp is done, I should have space to add a 1m lathe, hydraulic press, sheet bender, slip rolls and some other bits into the shop, and still get a vehicle in there with a minimum of fuss as well if needed.  I'd just have to move the T+C grinder out of the way.  And there's a reason I want to be able to get a vehicle in there...  It makes unloading heavy machinery a LOT easier if I can get it in there under the I-beam and chain hoist  :LittleDevil:

Quote
If I try to organize things then I forget where I put them.
  Vince, I have that same problem, but it's reached the point where I can't find them even if I know where I put them  :facepalm2:  There's nothing left to lose now...

Dave, at least you get MUCH more done than me while sorting out things; my hat's off to you  :NotWorthy:

Quote
Don't forget your fire extinguisher!
NEVER! - those are bits of kit that I know exactly where they're at - the shop one is mounted right next to that used-to-be-badly-wired light switch.  In fact, it's easier to reach the extinguisher than the switch when entering the shop!  Another one in the kitchen on top of the fridge; easy as getting a cold beer to get to that one.  And one in each of the cars  ;)

From everybody's responses, it's really good to know I'm not the only who get the shop in a horrible state, and that it's in fact a global problem  :)

As for the small drill press and getting more than I wanted:  I nipped off some time from "Work" work today and collected the lot. 
When I went to look at the drill press just over three weeks ago, it turned out that there was a selection of power tools available for sale - either in bits or as a job-lot.  There were some bits missing (nothing I could not make easily in my shop or buy cheaply), and the tools showed very little signs of actual use, so I put in a separate offer each on the drill press, an industrial quality battery powered hand drill, and a small mitre-saw at very low, but still reasonable, price.  I wasn't particularly interested in the  hammer drill and jigsaw that completed the job-lot (already have slightly better versions of those), so added N$50 (about US$ 5)  to the total of the other offers for the job-lot.  My offer (N$2450.00 / US$ 245.00) was accepted for the job-lot  :) :

I do have work for the items I put in individual bids on, but I don't know what to do with the extra jigsaw and drill...  I think I'll keep them around to borrow out to neighbours and friends as needed.

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline peatoluser

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2013, 03:01:34 PM »
Blimey! and I thought trying to fit out a 8 by 6 shed was a big enough task! my sympathies I know what your going through. No matter how long I spend trying to sort things out, I seem to be permanently stuck at the one quarter through the task point. I believe there's light at the end of the tunnel - it's just trying to find the bl**dy entrance is the hard part!

peter

Offline jwcnc1911

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2013, 04:40:47 PM »
I'm having serious envy issues over that workbench!
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JW

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2013, 06:50:17 PM »
Arnold, don't worry, it's a bachelor thing. What you need is a nice young sweet thing there to whip things into shape ( it's give and take you know, well, maybe you don't) . Now, that jig saw. If a man could knock himself a table up with the saw mounted from underneath and a slot in the "table" for just the blade to poke through, I bet it would cut a whole lot of our little fiddly bits. Maybe an over arm with a foot and guide bearings. If it's variable speed even the better. I bet a fellow could even adapt some needle files and have a mini die filer.

Whiskey

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #22 on: September 22, 2013, 06:04:12 PM »
Cheers Peter - I'm making headway, but much slower than anticipated.  At least there is light at the end of tunnel; I'm starting to get to bits of my shop I haven't seen for many years!

JW, the new workbench is already all cluttered up again  :Lol: - hopefully it'll be usable in future.

Eric, I'd be happy to have a nice young sweet thing around - that's currently a work in progress  ;) .  I also thought about modifying the jig saw, but it's not a variable speed, and much too fast for that kind of use.  So I'll keep it around as a spare; one of my upcoming tooling projects will be a small die filer, and one other bit of kit I'm keeping my eyes peeled for is a small scroll saw  :)

Some might have noticed that I've been very quiet of late on the forum.  Work commitments played a big role, and to cap things, my sister and brand spanking new brother-in-law pitched on a visit, so there was much entertaining to do...

With all the crud involved, things required quite a bit of moving around to sort out; here I'd moved a lot of stuff to the "clean" section of the shop and sorted out all my stock in piles:


Panning left from the last photo, one can actually see the shop floor; the space between the closer table and steel workbench with the vise on it was completely covered with boxes full of stuff.  Just for Zee and Jim - the fire extinguisher is visible hanging next to the door and close to where I normally work with gas torches and do welding  ;) :


The band saw sprouted a set of wheels, and some lifters below the feet on the other side to keep it level.  Still some paint required - but I needed to move it around:

 :( There's a nasty crack in the floor; I'll have to look into how to fix that a bit...

With most of the floor space sorted (and room to move in!), I need a LOT more shelving and drawer space.  A bunch of the old computers I chucked out had nice covers that looked like they could be made into storage space for abrasive paper..., so I spent some time with a drill and pop-rivet gun, added a bit of wood at the back to add some rigidity, and the result is a nice little rack.  Not pretty, but functional:


Two sections of the wood shelving I bought and some other odds 'n ends were cut up to minimize wastage, and cobbled together to make a fairly sturdy rack from:


That ended up getting bolted to the wall between the lathe and the mill, after moving away the old V6 engine that's been lying in the way there for about 5 years.  The rack is level; it's the blokes who mounted the trunking before I bought the house that did such an "excellent" job  ::) .  I have two doors (recycled single bed headboards  :Lol: ) to mount to the rack, but I have to shop for some suitable hinges first; I wasn't in the mood to make my own:


My ER11 collets have been standing around in the small individual boxes I bought them in; that's been a serious PITA, as they tend to easily get lost, and it's difficult to get the right size one.  So I spent a bit of time to make a case for them from some off-cut pine wood.  Yes, I  know...  Woodwork on the mill  :-X ...  At least it was fun to twiddle the wheels for a change instead of sweeping, carting and dusting  :) :




Some more recycling...  I do like cooking, and use a fair amount of olive oil.  My favourite brand comes in nice metal tins, and I've been collecting those over the years as well.  Some time with a can opener, and there's a bunch of tins for storing larger fasteners in a much more organized fashion than I have done in the past:


Still lots of sorting out left to do.  I want to build a small cabinet with some drawers to house the small lathe's accessories.  From my original full set of ER25 collets (all also still in separate little plastic containers) the ER25 collection has grown and now features additional ones in sizes regularly used on the mill, as well as a full higher-precision set.  All those need suitable organized storage.

At least there's progress; I'm itching to get back to work on engines, and it will be much nicer to do once all this is sorted out  :)

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline DaveH

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #23 on: September 22, 2013, 07:24:39 PM »
And if she gets interested in making model engines promise you will buy her her own lathe. Sharing a lathe  :ShakeHead:
Jo

A lass from Namibia interested in model engines  :lolb: :lolb: :lolb:
 :cheers:
DaveH

Offline mklotz

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #24 on: September 22, 2013, 10:25:27 PM »

Eric, I'd be happy to have a nice young sweet thing around - that's currently a work in progress  ;) ...Kind regards, Arnold
Just remember the short term time lost from the workshop for the courting is more than made up for in the long term

Yes, in the long term ALL your workshop time will be lost attending to all her silly requirements and honey-dos.
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Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2013, 01:05:35 AM »
You are so right Marv. It's well known here that Sunday is my and DOG's day in the shed. Today it only took four trips back to the house to take care of those " can you come here a minute, it won't take but a second" projects. But hey, the shed is nice and neat, she emptied all the trash cans and help sweep the floor. I even heard her practicing saying "swarf". It's all a trade off. Just don't plan on coming out on top :lolb:

Whiskey

Offline Maryak

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2013, 04:06:28 AM »
You could try being very brave or as most would say very foolish.

"Yes Dear," and then carry on with what YOU were doing. Works a treat for about 10 nanoseconds.  :o

Best Regards
Bob
Если вы у Тетушки были яйца, она была бы Дядюшкой

Offline propforward

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #27 on: September 23, 2013, 04:42:55 PM »
Romantic problems aside, Arnold I really like what you are doing with your shoppe. Some really good organisation going on there - very nice indeed. I especially like the wooden collet boxes.
Stuart

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2013, 06:42:21 PM »
 :lolb: Some of you might just put me off chasing lasses !

There's actually some lasses around who express more interest in my engines than most males...  It must be said though that it only extends to the really shiny ones  ;)

Thanks Prop - that collet box was just a "quickie" to sort out things a bit.  At some point I'll spend a bit of time with quality wood and make nicer ones.  I want to use it as-is for now to see how it works out and what I'd like to change.  It's more fun to use tools that's practically arranged in nice-to-handle-and-use storage.

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline propforward

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #29 on: September 23, 2013, 08:22:21 PM »

There's actually some lasses around who express more interest in my engines than most males...

It's a trap. Be very careful.  :paranoia:
Stuart

Offline mklotz

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #30 on: September 23, 2013, 10:16:07 PM »

There's actually some lasses around who express more interest in my engines than most males...

It's a trap. Be very careful.  :paranoia:

Truer words were never spoken.  Any woman who feigns interest in anything automotive, mechanical or mathematical is on the prowl and you're the prey.
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Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #31 on: September 23, 2013, 11:47:09 PM »
It is a mistake to have too much (or worse, too little) in common with the significant other.
So you end up choosing.
I have to say...sharing my hobby with she whom I share the rest of my life with is way down on the list.
Please understand me...those things that are on the list are associated with survival. Machining is just fun.
 :naughty:

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Offline swilliams

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #32 on: September 24, 2013, 01:51:25 AM »

There's actually some lasses around who express more interest in my engines than most males...

It's a trap. Be very careful.  :paranoia:

Truer words were never spoken.  Any woman who feigns interest in anything automotive, mechanical or mathematical is on the prowl and you're the prey.

That's too funny  :lolb:
but true  :o

Offline Pete49

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #33 on: September 24, 2013, 04:25:04 AM »
Funny how Marv tends to express here what most of us think and aren't game to say. :lolb: I guess age has a bit to do with that
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I used to have a friend.....but the rope broke and he ran away :(

Offline mklotz

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #34 on: September 24, 2013, 04:11:49 PM »
Funny how Marv tends to express here what most of us think and aren't game to say. :lolb: I guess age has a bit to do with that
Pete

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Offline Kim

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #35 on: September 24, 2013, 04:23:33 PM »
Is that frankness or is it cynicism?  :LittleDevil:
Kim

Offline mklotz

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #36 on: September 24, 2013, 04:34:48 PM »
Is that frankness or is it cynicism?  :LittleDevil:
Kim

You bet.

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Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #37 on: September 29, 2013, 07:41:10 PM »
Is that frankness or is it cynicism?  :LittleDevil:
Kim

You bet.
Answered in true Monty Python style...  I'll forgo the smiley in deference to wisdom.


Progress has been slow...  At least the rack I showed last time had doors added:

The one on the right is slightly warped, but it will have to do.

A lot of wood-working - outside the shop - followed:


That resulted in a bunch of material resembling flat-pack furniture; just a bit more random in the wood it came from:


Liberal amounts of work, glue, screws and even a lot of brads with a nail gun resulted in this lot:


 ::) There was still a problem though... - so I took a couple of minutes to make some handles for the drawers:

It might look better painted all-white, but I don't like painting, so it can stay as is; it's a question of function over looks for me.

The rest of the shop is also coming along as well.  There's still stuff that needs stowage space.  At least all the power tools now have their own spots, and most of the grime is out of the shop:




The rack and corner where the drill press is still needs sorting out.  The heavier bar stock will go under the cabinet between the lathe and the mill, but I still need to make a plan to keep the thin bar stock organized. The 1:1 scale 3l V6 engine lying under the black cover will most likely get removed from the shop soon as well  :)

Machinery-wise, the small lathe must be mounted, but I've been thinking (unthinkable as that may seem...)  The couple of times I've used it it was difficult to clean, especially under the bed-ways.  The simple solution was just to pick it up, move it out of the way, and clean the stand it was sitting on.  Once properly mounted, that can not be done, so I'm going to make a sub-base with riser blocks for it to overcome that problem.
The tool & cutter grinder's phase converter must also be mounted.  I received a package from overseas last week with two single-point diamond dressers in it, and the compressor is close-by for the air spindle, so once the electrics are sorted, I can start using it.  I'm really looking forward to that!

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Online steamer

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #38 on: September 29, 2013, 09:14:55 PM »
It's coming along really well Arnold!....Pay no never mind to the detractors....My Anna  is a keeper...and she knows she married my shop too.   She wouldn't have it any other way.

Ask her about lofting the boat on the kitchen/dining room/kitchenette floor with plywood, nails and battens and being requested to not step on it while it was there......for 3 weeks!

Like I said....she's a keeper!

Dave
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Damned ijjit!

Offline vcutajar

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2013, 09:29:56 PM »
Arnold, when you finish with your shop can you come and do mine?  Please  :naughty:

Vince

Offline Don1966

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #40 on: September 29, 2013, 10:43:06 PM »
It's coming along really well Arnold!....Pay no never mind to the detractors....My Anna  is a keeper...and she knows she married my shop too.   She wouldn't have it any other way.

Ask her about lofting the boat on the kitchen/dining room/kitchenette floor with plywood, nails and battens and being requested to not step on it while it was there......for 3 weeks!

Like I said....she's a keeper!

Dave

Dave I would say she's is differently a keeper. Mind would say put it in the shop and she doesn't mind anything I do there.
Arnold, pay no mind to us old timers, we all went through the trials and tribulations of courting a gal. Just remember they will do what it takes to set the hook, but it's all good in the end.
The shop is shaping up there bud.

Don

Offline rleete

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #41 on: September 30, 2013, 01:08:00 AM »

Progress has been slow...  At least the rack I showed last time had doors added:

The one on the right is slightly warped, but it will have to do.

As is the owner, as well as the vast majority of the rest of us.  IOW, it fits right in.

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #42 on: October 06, 2013, 10:42:36 PM »
Thanks Dave  :)

LOL - Vince, I've just about finished now, and while I'm trying to be good at sharing, I'll sit that one out.  It's been a heck of a job...  Hopefully I can keep things clean for a while now.

Don, Thanks Bud !

Thanks rleete.  As long as the warp doesn't show up in any engines I build I'm happy  :) .  And eccentric...  That's quite acceptable in engines though.

Finally; the home stretch...  I've had just about as much as I can stand of cleaning, sweeping, packing, stacking and all the rest, but with a last push this weekend the cleaning got finished, and things tidied up pretty much as far as I can for now.  To get things beyond this level, I'd need more cabinets and racks, throw out even more rubbish treasures, and develop some kind of disorder.  I'm happy with the ones I already have, and a slight bit of disorder left in the shop is fine by me, so I called it a day with the organizing.  A couple of views:








As part of all the cleaning, all the machines also got a decent clean and service.  The milling machine received a gearbox oil change, and both compressors' tanks were drained and oil levels topped up.

On to mounting the small lathe.  A while ago I dug out it's manual and went over the mounting instructions.  Simple.  It mounts with two 8mm bolts.  I thought I had adequate material to make the riser blocks I want for it from.  Something was niggling at the back of my mind though.  I've learned the hard way to trust such niggles.  So I up-ended the lathe and had a look at it's bottom; not a view one often sees:


 ::) Things are NOT what I expected.  First off, the two "mounting holes" are visibly not 8.4mm like the manual states.  After checking them a bit, I found them to be 6.8mm - which is just about tapping size for M8...  And there's no casting scale or anything lodged in them; they're cleanly drilled.  The hole at the tailstock end is fine; there's quite a bit of surface area around it and cleaned up on the bottom of the bed ways to make it quite usable.
But I really don't understand the fiasco at the headstock end  :Mad: .  The four big holes in it seems completely and utterly useless - to the point where they actually weaken the mounting.  There's no way I can currently think of that those can be used to help mount the lathe, and with the actual mounting hole so close to the edge of the mounting surface, especially at the headstock end, I have serious concerns on how well it will stand up in use.
Introducing riser blocks to this lot may just make matters worse.  I can tap the two mounting holes out to M8 - or drill them out 8mm for mounting, but I'm scared that would weaken things even further.  If it were not for the four large holes already present in the headstock end, I'd have no hesitation about adding a new, more central hole to the mounting surface to mount things with.  As it is, it already looks like a bit of Swiss cheese, and while that's nice to eat, it's not renown for bolting down lathes.

I really want this lathe operational, so for now, I just mounted it through the worktop with 6mm cap screws onto the supplied oil pan - no modifications at all, no riser blocks, and I took care not to over-tighten the cap screws. 

Had a quick go at turning some chips with it; the shop's much too clean  :Lol: .  Some 5mm hex brass turned down to leave a 0.5mm "rod" in one fell swoop:

That went OK...

Some of my "horrible" mild steel - it was chucked up on the "clean" section on the left, and has a whopping big hole through it to boot.  That left a lot of chatter:

To be fair though, I even struggle to get a nice finish on that crud with the Myford, and the toolbit I used on the small lathe was a bit above center and not as sharp as it should be...

A quick test on some 10mm aluminium with the same poorly set-up tool from the steel test, and auto-feed:

For a first go on this lathe, that is surprisingly presentable.  I have a hunch I may just get the hang of this little machine, especially once I get her tooled up  :)

Shop time has been really scarce of late, but there just may be a bit of light at the end of the tunnel...  Hopefully I can pick up things a bit soon and get back to the MEM Corliss and some new engine builds.

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline mklotz

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #43 on: October 06, 2013, 11:48:40 PM »
Damn, Arnold, I wish I had that much space.  [Garaj Mahal seems to shrink every day - an effect that correlates well with SWMBO's shopping trips.]

I don't see Shrek's supervisory perch in any of those pictures.  Or does he just perch pirate-like on your shoulder and take a piece out of your ear every time you make a mistake?
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Offline Kim

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #44 on: October 07, 2013, 03:54:32 AM »
Man, that looks great Arnold!   :ThumbsUp: Lots of clean space, cleared benches, freshly serviced machines...  You're all set to start turnin' out the projects!  ;D

Great work on the clean up.  It does take a while, but sure feels good when you get it done, doesn't it?  :cartwheel:

Kim

Offline EmanMyford

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #45 on: October 07, 2013, 09:04:58 AM »
Looking great Arnold. I am also very envious of all your space.  :ThumbsUp:
Ewald

Offline Don1966

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #46 on: October 07, 2013, 02:10:20 PM »
Man you have been busy and it shows. Now you have a nice clean shop to dirty up. Is that a painting oven I see under the bench next to what looks like a generator?

Don

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #47 on: October 07, 2013, 05:52:47 PM »
Time to mess it up!
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Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #48 on: October 07, 2013, 09:04:33 PM »
I think all us old married chaps just got him fired up with all  the lassie talk. Looks great old boy. Now, have you almost tripped and fallen, stepping over something that isn't there anymore? Hey, if you ever want to get that old Continental Tire sign outta sight, I got just the place for it :naughty:. Really, looking great.

Whiskey

Offline DaveH

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #49 on: October 09, 2013, 12:01:08 PM »
Looks great Arnold, a very nice place to spend some time.  :ThumbsUp: You did a good job
 :cheers:
DaveH

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #50 on: October 13, 2013, 10:41:00 AM »
A belated Thanks all.

Marv, Shrek's not allowed in the shop - he has a habit of picking up the most annoying sounds and merrily repeating them as part of his repertoire.  I won't look forward to getting scared out of bed in the mornings by the (amplified) sound of a brass cut in full chatter...

Don, it's just a normal kitchen oven that I replaced with a nicer one in the house's kitchen when I moved in.  I have toyed with the thought of wiring it up for use in the shop, and it will make a good place to let painted parts dry  ;)

Quote
Time to mess it up!
Mess it up - yes! - but unfortunately the "time" part is currently at a premium...

Eric, it's actually feels weird walking around all over the place without having to step over things.  The tire sign was left by the previous owner; he used to service and rebuild Mazda rotary engines in it.

I must say, it has been worth the effort, though I keep forgetting where I put some things.  It'll take some getting-used to...

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Online steamer

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Re: Arnold's shop - then, now and a revamp
« Reply #51 on: October 13, 2013, 01:46:32 PM »
Nicely done Arnold.   I agree its nice to have it all sorted out....a shop seems to follow along the chaos theory, and gets disordered after a while....sometimes it just needs to get reined in...

Dave
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