Author Topic: Ryan's Engine  (Read 35135 times)

Offline Bearcar1

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 696
  • Chicagoland Area, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #90 on: September 07, 2012, 12:34:48 AM »
That jig is a great idea, I like it!

Simon

Thanks for that Simon. I try to look for ways that will assure accurate locations without a great del of 'pain' and this one served a treat.
I made exactly the same mistake as you with the hight and did the bends exactly the same as you. I wonder how many other budding model makers did this  :Lol: On reflection it seems like it would catch anyone without an engineering background. Nice job with the jig.
Pete


I'm just a bit put-off by the fact that the drawings are so vague in there representation. No harm. no foul, I suppose but man did it have me going for a little while. :cussing:


BC1
Jim

Offline Bearcar1

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 696
  • Chicagoland Area, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #91 on: September 09, 2012, 03:29:44 PM »
Things got down to some serious tolerance keeping for a little while as I set to work on the crank disk. Here can be seen the crank pin being turned. I spent a great deal of time applying a stone to this cutter and used .005" DOCs to finally sneak up on the exact finished diameter I was shooting for of .1875". Bingo missy! The original drawings show just a plain pin that has a thread cut on one end. This then, would get threaded into a tapped hole in the crank disk. I was thinking to myself, "not good enough" :thinking:  in that if the threads were not cut precisely, there was a very good chance the pin would wind up not being truly square to the surface of the disk. So.... I set about turning up a slight shoulder on the pin that would eliminate any mis-alignment when the pin was screwed firmly home.




The disk itself is a piece of nickel alloy from trim adorning the old financial trading floor of the Chicago Board of Trade. I had to make some holes with a hole saw through these trim pieces one evening while doing work on the floor so I can attest to its providence. The hole in the center of this knock-out was a bit wonky so I had to bore it a tad oversize to clean it up and then turned down a small reducer bushing from brass to fill the hole. The counterweight is from a piece of scrap bearing bronze that was in the seconds drawer and it is held in place by two aluminum rivets. (I didn't have any copper ones of that size)





The next piece will be the connecting rod and I have some minor modifications in mind there as well so stay tuned, there's plenty more to follow.


BC1
Jim

Offline rleete

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 179
  • Rochester, NY USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #92 on: September 09, 2012, 04:18:09 PM »
if the threads were not cut precisely, there was a very good chance the pin would wind up not being truly square to the surface of the disk.

Good thinking, as I have discovered this is the source of binding on previous engines like this.  I, too, cut a small shoulder to help keep things square.

Offline zeeprogrammer

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6373
  • West Chester, PA, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #93 on: September 09, 2012, 04:18:42 PM »
Looks good.

How did you do the rivets?
Why not use bolts?

I don't have a good visualization...will that counterweight with rivets get in the way?
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Bearcar1

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 696
  • Chicagoland Area, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #94 on: September 09, 2012, 11:33:08 PM »
Good thinking, as I have discovered this is the source of binding on previous engines like this.  I, too, cut a small shoulder to help keep things square.
Thanks RL', seems we have the same thought process ...  :toilet_claw:  all great minds think alike ???  :hellno:


Looks good.

How did you do the rivets?
Why not use bolts?

I don't have a good visualization...will that counterweight with rivets get in the way?


Hi Zeep'. I could have used bolts I do suppose  but the drawings called for rivets and I think it gives the piece a bit of character as well. If I were to use bolts, screws actually, I would probably used oval head countersunk bits as the back of the disk needs to be flat in order to seat flush to eccentric. I used a small countersink and cut small divots in the back at the hole locations, then, after installing the rivets I merely peened them a bit to get them to mushroom into these cavities and when it was all over, filed and sanded the back flat. There should be no clearance problems as there is supposed to be a spacer behind the con-rod in order to keep it from fouling the counterweight assembly.

BC1
Jim

« Last Edit: September 09, 2012, 11:40:38 PM by Bearcar1 »

Offline steamer

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10238
  • Central Massachusetts, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #95 on: September 10, 2012, 01:38:15 AM »
I like that crank Jim!

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline Bearcar1

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 696
  • Chicagoland Area, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #96 on: September 11, 2012, 03:47:32 PM »
Thanks for that Dave, and yes, I am pretty proud of my crank as well  :embarassed: :help: :naughty: :toilet_claw: :Lol:


'this boy needs some some serious help I tell you, cuz' he's not right, if you know what I mean"  :Doh:


I've been puttering around with the con rod for a day or so now and may have something to show later today. Been molling some idea about the piston as well.


later


BC1
Jim

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13584
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #97 on: September 11, 2012, 09:26:02 PM »
Nice work on the crankdisk and pin Jim. The assembly looks like it shoudl work perfectly. I like the added character provided by the counterweight and rivets too!!

Bill

Offline Bearcar1

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 696
  • Chicagoland Area, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #98 on: September 12, 2012, 02:20:47 PM »
Nice work on the crankdisk and pin Jim. The assembly looks like it shoudl work perfectly. I like the added character provided by the counterweight and rivets too!!

Bill


Hi Bill, yeah, that collection of bits and bobs was a bit fiddly as it were, but turned out to be an acceptable variation of the original. I think the center hub (bushing/adapter) gives the overall piece a bit of added depth. I really wished that I had some copper rivets that small but, this worked out OK in the long run. The crank pin had me going for a little while getting that nice smooth as silk finish and spot on at that.


After gaining some working experience with the stainless steel sheet used on the standards, I dove into creating the connecting rod. It began by first dying up a small-ish strip and scribing a center line as a reference. The the lines for the outside edges were scribed, leaving me a strip of metal with three lines on it. I then used a center punch and popped the hole locations, followed by drilling .0625". I then concentrated on making up a set of filing buttons the diameters of the two ends and drilled a .0625" hole through their centers. These holes would be used for the 'axle' when it came time to file the ends to their final shape. I turned my attention back to the strap and had a brilliant idea, why not use my Dremel with a large cut-off wheel mounted, to remove the excess material of the waist portion of the rod. It worked a treat! I clamped the piece with the edge of the piece overhanging the side of my work table and carefully ground away material until I was very close to the scribed line. Doing the opposite side was a little tricky because there was not a whole lot of surface area left to clamp, but I took my time and got the job done. After getting this far, I went to town using the filing buttons and a lengthy session of 'character building' and formed the rounded portions of the ends. Here is the results. I still have just a bit of detail profiling yet to define the corners better but that should not be too bad. Then I have a plan for the big end that I hope will work, but I won't spoil the surprise for you guys just yet.  :naughty:





TALLYHO!


BC1
Jim






Offline Bearcar1

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 696
  • Chicagoland Area, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #99 on: September 13, 2012, 07:34:17 PM »
I don't have any pictures as yet to show of my efforts, but I decided to get along with making the piston for this beast. It has been interesting to say the very least. You all have known the feeling, turn to over-size and then sneak agonizingly up on a finished size in .005" increments. Gees, I don't know what is worse, a trip to the dentist or this. At least at the dentist they give you something to knock the edge off a little.  :insane:  Anyway, I got the 'slug' turned to it's final size +.001-ish and was satisfied with the finish. The slug was turned over-long and was still in the lathe when I cleaned it all off with brake cleaner and applied a paste of dental polish. I cleaned out the cylinder bore with blake cleaner and a cotton swab thoroughly as well. Man, you should have seen the amount of crud that came out of the hole when I did this. I then started to wring the cylinder onto the slug by hand and with no power applied and found that it was reasonably tight but I took my time and backed it out regularly and reapplied some more paste and went at it again. After several times of doing this, it got to the point that the slug would turn in the bore with just a hint of resistance and I then stopped, cleaned them both again and did a final lap using some metal polish. Smooooth as a babies butt I'm here to tell you. I was stoked. Another thorough cleaning and the application of some light oil and the piston slug would produce a resounding pop when pulled out, rather forcefully (only because of the vacuum being created) from the cylinder.  :whoohoo:  Now I'm off to finish shaping the slug which should not be too bad of an ordeal. At least the worst part of it is over ......... for now.


BC1
Jim

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13584
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #100 on: September 13, 2012, 08:18:50 PM »
Congrats Jim...that can be a tedious job but it sounds like it went very smoothly (no pun intended) :)

Bill

Offline zeeprogrammer

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6373
  • West Chester, PA, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #101 on: September 13, 2012, 10:43:26 PM »
Sounds really good Jim.
So far all my pistons just kind of rattle.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline swilliams

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 896
  • Canberra Australia
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #102 on: September 14, 2012, 12:10:17 AM »
Sounds like its all coming together really well Jim. It'll be chugging along soon enough

Steve

Offline Bearcar1

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 696
  • Chicagoland Area, USA
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #103 on: September 15, 2012, 02:03:27 PM »
Bill, Zee', Steve, hey thanks for hanging in there with me. I'm closing in on the final gun-lap and have to force myself not to rush things at this point. Finishing up the piston took more time than I think was really necessary but in the end, it produced a good useable part. The slitting saws I have are all very thin and I had such good results in using the Dremel and cut-off wheel method on the valve, so I figured, "why not?". I've used this method  on other occasions and it seemed to work its magic here once again. A piece of .750" steel hex, floats around the bottom of my seconds drawer and I put it to use here as a holding and drilling fixture. There is a small lump of copper wire underneath the end of that cap screw to prevent marring the piece.





I've got to work on getting things pinned together now and then its on to finishing off the big end, followed by the all knowing, all revealing smoke test, which is going to be quite interesting I think.  :shrug: :smokin2: :help: :slap: :ThumbsUp: :whoohoo: :DrinkPint: basically all in that order........ I hope.


BC1
Jim

Offline Dean W

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 200
  • A balanced diet is a bag of M&Ms in each hand...
    • Home Shop Projects
Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #104 on: September 15, 2012, 09:53:09 PM »
Good show on slitting that piston end, Jim.
Dean
In beautiful N. Idaho, U.S.A.

Shop Projects:
http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/projects/projects.html