Author Topic: Ryan's Engine  (Read 35359 times)

Offline vcutajar

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2012, 09:45:32 PM »
Hi Jim

Just found this build log and will be following you on your journey.

Vince

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2012, 04:30:53 AM »
 Hi Vince, glad to have you along for the ride.   :atcomputer: After completing the boring operation on the bearing pedestal last night, I was left with a half-hole in the top of the lump where the main bearing would rest. I did some more layout and located and drilled through at six locations to provide for the mounting studs. It was easier to do now when the part was just a square lump.  At that point, it was into the mill to do some profiling with a ball nosed end mill. This operation took a bit of time as shallow depth cuts were the order of the day. One will notice the round bar I used in front of the moving jaw of the vise, this insures that the piece is held squarely against the fixed jaw. Once this slot was finished, the part was turned over and the same slot was mirrored on the opposite side.



BC1
Jim

Offline cfellows

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2012, 03:53:24 PM »
I started collecting Popular Science and Popular Mechanics magazines when I was a kid back in the 1950's.  I managed to accumulate most issues from the 1930's up until the 1970's when they changed format and became a lot less interesting.  A few years back I gave the collection to a good friend who had a young son that I thought might get some good from them.  Now I think most issues of the older magazines are available for viewing on Google Books. 

Nice work on this engine, Jim.  Can't wait to see what it's going to look like!

Chuck
So many projects, so little time...

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2012, 05:53:41 PM »
Thanks Chuck, and a good thing you did with your magazine collection. (I wish I was that kid) I can distinctly remember, as a young lad,  going to the library in our small town and anxiously checking the rack to see if the latest issue of Popular Science and Popular Mechanics had arrived. Also, the place was air conditioned so it was a great place to hang out in the summer months.  :happyreader:

 During the last session in the shop, I did some more layout on the part and returned it to the mill to profile the two opposite sides to get a "waisted" effect. In order to prevent any distortion of the part, I placed a .625" piece of round stock in the half round hole and tightened up the vise. This piece has already been through several design changes and will most likely go through some more as I get further along. I have a 'vision' in my head of what I want this piece to look like so am kind of going with the flow. (does anyone else ever have visions in their head?  :DrinkPint: just asking)



I got things cut to the proper depth by cutting to the line, a few thousandths difference would be no big deal as these cuts were purely cosmetic in nature. Then I began to form up the shell that would ultimately be placed over the bearing, a sort of cap if you will. To form this, I drug out a plate that I had used on another project and bolted  small stub to it. Then, using a block of wood as a stop (not shown in this image) and a mallet, I form the piece of brass around the stub. That's as far as things are going to progress today.



BC1
Jim

Offline Dean W

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2012, 10:19:00 PM »
I think I see what is intended here, Jim;  The bearing has a curved strap over the top of it to hold it to the block?
Sort of like a pillow block bearing?
Dean
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Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2012, 03:34:05 AM »
I think I see what is intended here, Jim;  The bearing has a curved strap over the top of it to hold it to the block?
Sort of like a pillow block bearing?

Ding! Ding! Ding! We have a winner!!  You are correct Dean :ThumbsUp:, what I am shooting for is a pedestal that will support the bering and have that brass strap over it. I was going to simply use a rectangular block with a hole through it for the pedestal and then changed my mind. Then I was going to use a smaller rectangular piece with the bearing attached to it and finally settled upon this arrangement. It is truly amazing how such a little thing as this can mushroom into a major undertaking, but in the end, a visually appealing and functional part is the name of the game.

BC1
Jim

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #21 on: July 31, 2012, 02:44:40 AM »
Well, I did some more work on the bearing pedestal and think that I am pretty close to having it the way I want it. That "U" shape that I bent up got cut oversize and then transfered to the mill for sizing. Instead of using a slitting saw, I used one of hose abrasive cut-off wheels made for the Dremel style tools. Here it can be seen making quick work of slicing through the legs of the piece.



After which I spent some time with the torch and some solder and I had the part almost finished. Quickly back into the mill for a 'haircut', trimming the ends up nice and flush to the bottom of the main base piece.



And then finally, after some work with a bit of emory, some character building (a file) and a quick polish.



BC1
Jim

Offline Dean W

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #22 on: July 31, 2012, 03:04:37 AM »
That looks really smart, Jim!  It's a beautiful piece all on its own.  Nice work!
Dean
In beautiful N. Idaho, U.S.A.

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Offline swilliams

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #23 on: July 31, 2012, 04:16:51 AM »
The bearing pedestal looks great Jim

Steve

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #24 on: August 01, 2012, 12:34:41 AM »
 Steve and Dean, thanks for the support.  One thing that I forgot to mention was that I used two discs with a quarter inch hole in their centers to hold the crankshaft level while i soldered the lot together. Without them the crankshaft had a small amount of tilt along its axis, probably not enough to be of any consequence and certainly nothing that would be noticeable but I wanted to have everything plumb before proceeding. I'm thinking now of rounding over the bottom corners of the upper portion to give it a bit less of a 'clunky' look. Overall, I'm pleased with this design, it just looks so much more substantial over what the drawings called out. Hmmm, perhaps an oiler cup :noidea: ? I most likely won't get much done for the rest of the week but that's OK, it will give me time to plan how I'm going to get away with go about fabricating the standards for the cylinder. :toilet_claw:

BC1
Jim

Offline ironman123

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #25 on: August 01, 2012, 04:09:27 AM »
Looking real nice.  Keep going.

Ray
Ray
Central Texas

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #26 on: August 03, 2012, 05:40:39 PM »
Thank you Ironman, I shall, do my very best in order to do so. A couple of nights ago, I got home from work late and was pretty wound up from the daily grind  :fos:, so instead of going to bed as I usually do because I have to get up before dawn, I ventured downstairs to the shop for what was to be just a short R&R session. Previously, I had mentioned an oil cup in passing and I once again began to form a picture in my mind. I was going to turn one up and began sifting through the seconds drawer looking for material, when I remembered that I had made up a bunch of them for another project several years ago and set about the task of looking for them. After a brief search, I located the small jewelers tin labeled "oiler cups" and to my mild irritation  :facepalm:, there was only one left. On the other hand, I was glad and relieved, because now I would not have to fool with all that goes into their makings tonight, and made a mental note that sometime in the future I needed to replenish the stock. After doing a visual check for the approximate location, I used the height gage to layout the center of the top portion and made a center pop. Getting the piece in the 4 jaw chuck and using the wiggler/DI method, the center pop was soon running true and I proceeded to drill the the oil hole. I used a size about half the diameter of the oiler cup throat to break into the hole for the crankshaft, followed by the tap drill size for the 5-40 threads that were on the oiler. This hole was not drilled completely through but left just shy and was then threaded. Then I chucked a .1875" end mill in the tailstock and advanced it into the piece until I had a nice flat surface for the oiler to seat against. Before the oiler was screwed into place, I cut a tiny piece of industrial felt and poked it down into the threaded hole and then installed the oiler cup. My grandfather would do this on his engines as it slows the oil from flowing freely out and has a wicking action much like an oil lamp. It is very effective in providing just the right amount of oil to the shaft and cuts down on the mess and having to keep refilling the oil cup so often. Now, FINALLY,  :pinkelephant: I think I have this piece finished. I left the side of the bearing that faces the eccentric tapered so that one could see the action a bit better and to also cut down on the frictional surface. I slept very well that night and now can move on.



BC1
Jim
« Last Edit: August 03, 2012, 09:55:31 PM by Bearcar1 »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #27 on: August 04, 2012, 03:22:33 AM »
I'll leave a comment here rather than the Shoutbox since I apparently 'stink' at that...   ;D

That's really good looking.
Also glad to get the tip on using felt.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline swilliams

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2012, 03:24:50 AM »
Yep, looks great Jim. What material do you use to make your oil cups?

Steve

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Ryan's Engine
« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2012, 03:40:02 AM »
I'll leave a comment here rather than the Shoutbox since I apparently 'stink' at that...   ;D

That's really good looking.
Also glad to get the tip on using felt.


LoL!! :ROFL:  That's funny Zee'. I have the shoutbox  :atcomputer: disabled anyway. Glad to know you found the felt tip  useful.


Yep, looks great Jim. What material do you use to make your oil cups?

Steve


Steve, I'm not exactly sure what the grade of material is. My father gave me a handful of brazing rods he had not used up, when he retired, and I have found hem to be quite handy for small rounds like this. It may be some sort of a bronze alloy as it is a bit harder than 360 brass and makes a flaky sort of chip.


BC1
Jim