Author Topic: Myfored saddle stop  (Read 6859 times)

Offline Firebird

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Myfored saddle stop
« on: July 22, 2012, 11:59:02 AM »
Hi

another one of those should have done it years ago things. Once again no plans just build to fit. The round bar is 8mm and came out of an old printer.







Cheers

Rich

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Myfored saddle stop
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2012, 08:57:14 PM »
Nice going Rich  ;D

As useful as the Myford's gap bed is, it does make life harder when trying to use a bed-mounted saddle stop.

 :) I also like roundy bits out of old printers!

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline Stuart

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Re: Myfored saddle stop
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2012, 08:33:33 AM »
Nice work but having  a 7B  ( with gear box ) fills that area up

a neat solution using the tapped holes that are present

I have built the Hemingway one that fits on the TS end and connects to the thread dial stud


works well
http://www.hemingwaykits.com/acatalog/Multi_Position_Saddle_Stop___Myford_7_Series.html


Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline tel

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Re: Myfored saddle stop
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2012, 09:14:49 PM »
Nice one Rich, almost in the same spot as mine.

My lathe was not cleaned up for this pic, BTW. ;)



The older I get, the better I was.
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Offline arnoldb

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Re: Myfored saddle stop
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2012, 10:02:00 PM »
Quote
My lathe was not cleaned up for this pic, BTW. ;)
Looks much too tidy to me Tel - you should make some chips for a change.
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline tel

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Re: Myfored saddle stop
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2012, 09:53:36 AM »
Nah - might scratch the paint!

And for those odd occasions when a rear saddle stop is needed (it happens) I made this cheap and cheerful gizmo.
The older I get, the better I was.
Lacerta es reptiles quisnam mos non exsisto accuso nusquam

Offline Bill L.

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Re: Myfored saddle stop
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2012, 06:05:13 PM »
Good one Rich :ThumbsUp:. I always like seeing picts of your beautiful Myford.
Bill L.
Central California

Offline Firebird

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Re: Myfored saddle stop
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2012, 08:05:01 PM »
Hi

Thanks gents.

Tel, I like the idea of the rear saddle stop, I gotta make one of them now  ::) ::)

I also like the idea of the little handles, removes the need to search for the hex key, I gotta make them as well now ::) ::)

Cheers

Rich

Offline mklotz

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Re: Myfored saddle stop
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2012, 08:21:21 PM »
For the benefit of readers who may not notice...

Pay attention to Tel's design of the lozenge-shaped T-nut that he uses to secure his stop.  This shape allows him to drop the T-nut into the slot at any point (as opposed to sliding it in from the end of the slot), twist it a bit and have it seat against the slot flanges to hold the carriage stop in place.

Exactly the same principle can be used for T-nuts for the milling machine.  Especially handy if you need to mount a clamp between two that are already in place.

One caution... If you make such clamps be aware that they can not handle the loads that a standard T-nut can.  Don't reef on them.  [Actually, you shouldn't be reefing on any of your T-nuts.  Too much risk of damaging the mill table.  Use more clamps, position them more carefully, or rethink your clamping strategy if you need more holding force.]
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Regards, Marv


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