Author Topic: Starting Again  (Read 4463 times)

Offline ColH

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Starting Again
« on: April 16, 2013, 12:52:48 PM »
Hi Guys

I have been without a workshop for just under 2 years and I am moving to a new place in about six weeks.   The new place has a 6.1m long x 6.6m wide carport with a 6.6m x 3.6m workshop at the back.

The current plan is to:
1.  Move workshop machines & contents/household stuff from storage into the workshop space. 
2.  Enclose the carport to make a garage/storage/dirty workshop area.
3.  Move everything out of the workshop and into the new garage so I can start work on the workshop fitout.

Below are a couple of pics of the new workshop space filled with the old owners stuff.

In the workshop I intend to:
•  Move the back wall out another 600mm to line up with the side of the garage. I will also install a large window in this wall (east facing).  I will fit weatherboard to the outside to match the existing walls as you can see daylight through the existing end wall cladding.
•  Run a new power feed to the workshop garage direct from the house power board.  Several sub-circuits will then be installed in the workshop and garage as well as new lighting.
•  Insulate and line all the walls and install an insulated  ceiling below the roof trusses so the shop is cool in summer and warm in winter.

Next job will be the fit out of the workshop.

Rather than describe what machines I have, below is a video of my old workshop which was half the size of the new one.  Some of you may have seen this when I posted it on the MadModder a few years ago.  I constructed all the benches from scratch but could only bring the lathe, mill and bandsaw benches when I moved.  As you can see I am a bit of a neat freak – a place for evcerything and everything in its place. I cannot stand not being able to find things.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOO5sjAEguc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOO5sjAEguc</a>

Now to the real purpose of this post.
 
What are peoples thoughts on workshop layout and best practice for the location for machines, benches etc . 
  • Is it better to have the machines against a wall or out in the open so they can be accessed from all sides?
  • Maybe the mill and lathe back to back in the middle of the shop.
  • Should a bench top overhang the cupboard underneath?
  • There definitely won’t be any open shelves under benches!

Any hints on what not to do will also be appreciated.

Col
« Last Edit: April 16, 2013, 01:02:58 PM by ColH »
ColH

Offline Jo

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2013, 12:59:55 PM »
 :hi: Col.

  • Is it better to have the machines against a wall or out in the open so they can be accessed from all sides?
  • Maybe the mill and lathe back to back in the middle of the shop.
IMHO you only put machines facing the centre after you have run out of wall space, to put them against.
  • Should a bench top overhang the cupboard underneath?
Yes if you want to clamp to the worktop.

We would also liike to know what sort of things you might want to make  ;).

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline ColH

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2013, 01:15:39 PM »
Thanks Jo

I made an intro back in August as follows:

Quote
Hi Guys

I have been around for a while and came over from the "other side".  Work with Bez.

Enjoy keeping up with builds but miss my workshop which is in storage after a move from Queensland to Melbourne.  I will ahve to wait a while longer and endure another move before I can start the workshop rebuild again for the third time.

I was fortunate enough to buy a old guys workshop after he decided he no longer had the drive to use it.  I have a Hercus 260 lathe (Aussie version of the southbend), an Emco FB2 mill, H/V bandsaw, rotary plus a lot of tooling some from the original 'buy' but alot added since.  Also got an 8mm Lorch watchmakers lathe that has produced some pieces for a John wilding designed 12" dial clock that is half built.

I would also like to give engine making a go.  I have plans for a series of wobblers that were published in ME man years ago.  I also have the block and sump castings for the Wallaby that I got from Bez when Metalmad and I did some casting with him.  Don't forget you owe me a timing cove and head casting Bez when you get them done

Col!
ColH

Offline Jo

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2013, 01:57:45 PM »
Sorry Col, must be asleep.  :shrug:

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2013, 02:08:46 PM »
Sounds like a good plan to me Col. Once the carport is enclosed you will have a nice space most of us can only envy!!

Bill

Offline Rayanth

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2013, 06:00:22 PM »
I asked the question regarding 'ideal workshop layout' back when I was first tooling up, on another forum. The almost unanimous response was "Whatever works for you and makes sense to you"

There is no real ideal workshop layout. In the model making hobby, there's no standard workflow, so you can't set up the shop so it would be ideal in an assembly line fashion - say for example bandsaw, then grinder, then lathe, then mill, then disc/belt sander, then buffer, assuming you would work from left to right. It doesn't quite work that way because you won't always work in that same sequence.

So ultimately, the best workshop layout is one that you are comfortable with, and makes sense to you -- you want everything to be where your brain intuitively wants it, because you'll find it much easier and faster whenever you need it, versus if you put it where someone else recommends and then you have to think about it when you want it. Go for what feels right.

That said, some things to consider, since you're in a semi-tight space:
-- working envelope of your machines. Don't put the mill so close to the lathe that you won't get the mill's full table travel.
-- safety, safety, safety - tightly packed machines will make you 'squeeze' in there, or stand just at a certain way, and that may be incredibly unsafe. if you have to turn sideways between your mill and lathe to work on the lathe, and the lathe catches and you need to evacuate, you don't want to find out that your belt loop got stuck on the mill's table handle.
-- comfort. You will enjoy your shop time far more if everything you work with frequently is in easy reach and easy to find. Set your workbench heights to the comfortable height for you -- not just what the industry sticks to as a standard. "Ergonomics" is not just for office workers. Store your heavy items not on the bottom shelf, but at waist height -- less strain on your back to lift them. alternately, store them at roughly the height they will be used at, if it is safe to do so -- an example of this would be to store your lathe chucks at roughly worktop height, but that depends on space.
-- if possible, avoid having cross-bars or shelf edges near the working side of your workbenches. I can't count how many times I've bashed my shins into a shelf thinking I could move my foot forward a little.
-- SAFETY -- electrical cutoff switches should be the easiest part of a machine or electrical setup to reach. Don't hide anything you frequently use behind your lathe, or you WILL end up reaching for it while the lathe is turning, sooner or later. Same with the mill. Keep a services fire extinguisher in easy reach.
-- Machine Health -- don't block off oiling ports to larger machines, or you're likely to just forget about oiling them as it's just too tedious. Don't block off heat vents, either. Very importantly - do not face the 'exhaust' ports of your grinder towards any other machine, or the steel dust may get into the electrical components and cause you all sorts of 'fun'.

This is by no means an exhaustive list but should get you thinking on the right path.

Regarding the benches themselves - there are a few threads around about what work surface to use, and some great suggestions in those threads. Build your workbench to last, and it will. If your lathe and mill are benchtop types, remember that more mass is better -- I have a 90 pound lathe that I'm sure would love to twist itself if I were to take a heavy cut, but I've got it bolted to a massive workbench made of solid deck-grade 4x4's and two full sheets of 3/4" high density fiberboard. The workbench weighs close to 250 pounds, and since the lathe is bolted to it, that mass is added to the lathe's for rigidity.

-- Rayanth
---Please understand that I am a complete novice, and may take a very wrong path to doing things. Take my opinions and procedures with a grain of salt.
--- All photos taken with a Canon Rebel t1i and resized using "OptimumJPEG".
---Please alert me to any photos or links that do not load.

Offline mklotz

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2013, 06:41:56 PM »
Some random reminders...

Resist the temptation to put the electrical receptacles near the back of the bench.  Put them under the front projecting lip or on one of the front legs so that cords for tools can hang down and not lie all over the bench.

A few threaded inserts in the top of the main bench can be ever so handy for clamping, etc..

Remember to mount the bench vise so its fixed jaw is slightly forward of the bench front.  Then long pieces that reach to the floor can be clamped.

As proved by the ubiquitous design of mechanic's toolboxes, shallow drawers provide the best compromise between storage volume and accessibility.  Think about a small drawer set for the top of the main bench.  Grizzly has an inexpensive one.  Set it on risers and less often used tools can be stored beneath it.

No tools hung such that one must reach across the lathe to retrieve them.

Pegboard is, next to rock music, the most useless creation of mankind.  Avoid it.  Use solid plywood and nails or dowels to hold tools.

Fire extinguisher mounted near exit door.



Some things to think about...

A "belly bar" on the front of the lathe and mill benches.  Pressure on this horizontal bar cuts the power to the tool.  Better than an emergency cutoff one needs to locate when in trouble.  Just bang it with your hip or belly.

Pleasant chime "doorbell" triggered by anyone entering the shop.  Nothing worse than being scared by someone appearing when you thought you were alone - especially if using power tools.
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Offline ColH

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2013, 12:11:51 AM »
Bill, Rayanth, Marv

Thanks for the input.

Col
ColH

Offline ref1ection

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2013, 02:46:20 PM »
Do you have any pictures of this "belly bar" that you mentioned Marv? I tried google and you can imagine what I found. None of it relevant to this discussion.

Thanks
Ray
Indecision... the key to flexibility!

Offline KB

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2013, 04:11:51 PM »
That's going to be a nice shop.

Here is a nice tool for trying out different lay-outs;

http://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner

Offline mklotz

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2013, 04:28:06 PM »
Do you have any pictures of this "belly bar" that you mentioned Marv? I tried google and you can imagine what I found. None of it relevant to this discussion.

Sorry, no pictures.  I once had a cheapish table saw that had such a thing but it's been sold on.

At any rate, I wasn't talking about a commercial device. It's probably easier to design one's own.  A bar (or board) pivoted such that any pressure on it depresses a conventional emergency stop switch is all that is needed.

I think all lathes should be so equipped.  Think about it.  The lathe grabs some part of your clothing and starts reeling you in.  The first thing that happens is that your body is pulled up tight against the front of the swarf pan.  With the belly bar, that disables the lathe.  It might make the difference between a mangled limb and death.
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Offline ref1ection

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2013, 08:56:41 PM »
Thanks for the clarification Marv. I wasn't sure if there was a commercial version available and a search was counter productive.

Ray
Indecision... the key to flexibility!

Offline Rayanth

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Re: Starting Again
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2013, 07:29:13 AM »
some grocery stores' checkstands have a similar thing that the cashier leans against to make the conveyor belt turn. Might be able to find something along those lines and rig it up.

-- Rayanth
---Please understand that I am a complete novice, and may take a very wrong path to doing things. Take my opinions and procedures with a grain of salt.
--- All photos taken with a Canon Rebel t1i and resized using "OptimumJPEG".
---Please alert me to any photos or links that do not load.