Author Topic: Building my new workshop  (Read 34266 times)

Online Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #30 on: March 11, 2013, 10:43:20 PM »
Tim, you'll have a cup brewing and swarf on the floor in no time. Check into LED lighting. Price has come way down over here. It's great light and easy on the meter.
 :cheers:
Eric

Offline Mosey

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #31 on: March 11, 2013, 10:49:44 PM »
How many plugs of Indian Chief so far?
Keep up the good work, it looks great!
I bet the wife will appreciate the silence, too.
Mosey

Offline spuddevans

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #32 on: March 20, 2013, 05:38:27 PM »
Thanks guys.

We've been working away on insulating and plasterboarding, got all the walls insulated and covered, and as pictured below we've got the ceiling insulated, now completely insulated with between 2" and 60mm of kingspan insulation. The reason for the 2 different thicknesses is because that is what I was able to get off my brother who had some left over from building his house.



Following that picture I finished off the insulation, then taped all the joints to seal any air leaks ( I believe that the efficiency of this type of insulation depends on an air-tight fit )

Then my dad and I cut and fixed 2 sheets of plasterboard to the ceiling, they were the hardest as they were as-good-as full sheets, the rest will be about half-sheets, so much easier to handle.

The drop in noise from the outside is great, much reduced!

The next session should see the rest of the ceiling boarded, then it'll be taping the joints and then covering with compound.


Tim
Measure with a Micrometer, mark with chalk, cut with an axe. MI0TME

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #33 on: March 20, 2013, 07:12:48 PM »
Swell job Tim, you are certainly making good progress from a stack of wood to a structure. If you do not already know, apply your compound as sparingly as possible and in multiple, thin coats. This will serve to do two things, 1) it will reduce the amount of final/finish sanding and compound being wasted in doing that and 2) it will curtail cracking of the seams. Less is better even though it may take a bit more time. You are absolutely correct about insulation and sealing the cracks. Drafts are the number one source of heat loss, with radiant loss being number two. What size of power service are you planning to install?


BC1
Jim

Offline spuddevans

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #34 on: March 20, 2013, 09:05:41 PM »
Swell job Tim, you are certainly making good progress from a stack of wood to a structure. If you do not already know, apply your compound as sparingly as possible and in multiple, thin coats. This will serve to do two things, 1) it will reduce the amount of final/finish sanding and compound being wasted in doing that and 2) it will curtail cracking of the seams. Less is better even though it may take a bit more time. You are absolutely correct about insulation and sealing the cracks. Drafts are the number one source of heat loss, with radiant loss being number two.

I did not know that, thanks for letting me know that Jim :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: , I'll make sure to do that.

I'm not going to cover the screw-heads with compound, they are a really handy reminder of where the studs are located  :noidea:


Quote
What size of power service are you planning to install?
BC1
Jim

Because of the length of cable from my main fuse panel I've been advised to run 10mm square cables (not square cables, square mm  :Lol: ), but they will be run off a 45Amp breaker ( 240Volts single phase ) in the main fuse board, then I will put a secondary fuse-board in the workshop with 32Amp circuit breaker for the sockets and 6Amp breaker for the lights.

That's the plan anyway, it won't be too long before I'll be installing the electrics :whoohoo:


Tim
Measure with a Micrometer, mark with chalk, cut with an axe. MI0TME

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #35 on: March 20, 2013, 09:36:18 PM »
I have to tell you Tim, I'm feeling a lot of envy.
It's one thing to put a shop together...another to build the housing for the shop.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Arbalest

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #36 on: March 21, 2013, 11:38:30 AM »
If you do not already know, apply your compound as sparingly as possible and in multiple, thin coats. This will serve to do two things, 1) it will reduce the amount of final/finish sanding and compound being wasted in doing that and 2) it will curtail cracking of the seams. Less is better even though it may take a bit more time. You are absolutely correct about insulation and sealing the cracks. Drafts are the number one source of heat loss, with radiant loss being number two.
BC1
Jim

Good tip.  :ThumbsUp:

Offline hammer

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #37 on: March 21, 2013, 07:58:23 PM »
Fixing 8' + 4' sheets of plaster board brought back memories for me. when I was young & in my prime I fixed them to ceilings on my own with out using props. Some times got a bang on the back & a slap in the face, but not often. The secret 2 nails & 2 blocks of wood. I am not Hammer for nothing.

Offline steamer

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #38 on: March 22, 2013, 02:58:07 AM »
Looking great Tim!

Dave
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Offline spuddevans

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #39 on: April 01, 2013, 04:33:56 PM »
Another little update:

We've managed to get all the plasterboard fixed, joints scrimmed and then compound applied twice and then sanded.

Result:-





As this is just a workshop I am not going to go overboard on the joints, they are covered and while not up to a standard for my house, the fact is that most of the walls will be covered up with shelves and cupboards ( and eventually swarf and oil )


Then today we managed to nail up the 1st coat of paint. It's a bit rough looking, but the 2nd coat will smooth that out.

Then we'll be putting in some of the electrics.

Not much to report really, progress is slow but steady.

Tim
Measure with a Micrometer, mark with chalk, cut with an axe. MI0TME

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #40 on: April 01, 2013, 05:38:07 PM »
Great to see an update Tim. You must be glad to have all the plaster boarding done too!!  What little of that I've done was enough to teach me to stay away from it as much as possible :)  Must be exciting also to be getting this close to having your new "shop" home.

Bill

Offline spuddevans

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #41 on: April 01, 2013, 09:12:28 PM »
Great to see an update Tim. You must be glad to have all the plaster boarding done too!!  What little of that I've done was enough to teach me to stay away from it as much as possible :)  Must be exciting also to be getting this close to having your new "shop" home.

Bill

I don't mind the plasterboarding, it's the taping/compounding/compounding/compounding........ and then sanding/sanding/sanding, then if you dont seal it it just sucks paint like nothing else, and then when the paint dries you then see all the myriad of mistakes you made and then have to spend an age filling/sanding/painting/filling/sanding/painting..... etc etc.  :facepalm:

I am getting excited though, I keep running through in my mind where I'm going to put everything, then I have a terrible thought that I don't have enough space  :wallbang: :naughty: :LittleDevil:


Tim
Measure with a Micrometer, mark with chalk, cut with an axe. MI0TME

Offline steamer

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #42 on: April 02, 2013, 02:56:48 AM »
That looks awesome Tim! ....lots of light!

 :ThumbsUp:

Dave
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Damned ijjit!

Offline spuddevans

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #43 on: April 03, 2013, 07:38:48 PM »
Another little update:

I got the second coat of paint nailed up, looks a bit more consistent now.




My dad also brought round 2 sheets of 6mm ply (Actually not quite full sheets, about 7x4 ft each) Which we screwed up onto one wall along the top, it will be great for hanging tools and little shelves wherever I want.

Gave it one coat of paint,



And then after a few hours, another coat,




My dad also brought round a few fluorescent light fittings, they may or may not work, so I gotta test them before putting them up. Hope to put the lights up on Friday afternoon, then will be clearing out everything from the workshop at the weekend, another friend is coming round on early next week to install the floor screed to level up the floor.

That's the plan anyway.


Onwards and sideways,

Tim
Measure with a Micrometer, mark with chalk, cut with an axe. MI0TME

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Building my new workshop
« Reply #44 on: April 03, 2013, 08:12:29 PM »
Looking fine Tim. I hope that your plans progress as well as planned. Usually the only thing that goes pear shaped with florescent lighting is the ballast, which can be *shot* due to age and the other is the tubes themselves become worn out over time. I don't know if you are going to heat this cozy little abode in the colder months or not ut keep in mind that regular florescent ballasts do not work well in colder temperatures. Ballast for these conditions can be purchased but are a bit pricey. I have been considering getting a coupe for our garage (insulated but unheated) because the lights do not want to come on when it gets fairly cold outside.


BC1
Jim