Author Topic: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss  (Read 134646 times)

Offline vcutajar

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #195 on: May 11, 2013, 12:29:25 PM »
Good progress Arnold.

Quote
A bit of facet milling worked OK to shape the roundy-bits

I need to give that method a try.  Maybe on the top of the bearing blocks I am making at this time.

Vince

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #196 on: May 11, 2013, 01:19:01 PM »
Lovely work as always Arnold . Enjoy your long weekend :)

Bill

Offline Don1966

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #197 on: May 12, 2013, 01:27:10 AM »
Nice touch on the crank web Arnold, she's starting to shape up and looking good.

Don

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #198 on: May 12, 2013, 05:06:35 AM »
Thanks Jo -  Not to mention shoe-shopping  :Lol:   Got a Swedish clog thrown at me once for presenting a pair to an ex girlfriend after she tried on nearly all the shoes in the shop.  I think my last statement before the wooden footwear headed my way was "Heck, they should be comfy and kick up just as much of a racket as the last twenty pairs of high heels you tried on"  :LittleDevil:

Vince, thanks.  I saw from your last post you decided against the facet milling - that's just fine.  One of the freedoms of our hobby is that each and every one of us can do as we please in our shops.  There's no right or wrong.  Any way a part can be made safely is right  :)

Thanks Bill  :) - I am enjoying it !

Not much done today - but I did manage to add the mini how-do-I that I promised to Stew earlier on.

With due apologies to Bob Maryak, I deviated a bit from the plans for the crank pin.  Rather than using steel for it, I decided to make it from a combination of steel and brass.  The selection of materials is more "technically" correct rather than "hobby" correct; for hobby use all-steel would do just as well.  And, anyway, I used what I have on hand.  I could have made the entire crank pin from brass, but the M4 threaded section would carry quite a load while the engine is running.  The flywheel will end up carrying quite a bit of momentum, and IMHO in the overall design, the crank pin will be the weakest spot.

So I turned up the crank pin to dimensions, but rather than threading the end, I drilled, threaded and Loctited an M4 cap screw in there:


The cap screw was sawed off to length with a junior hacksaw, and the end cleaned up with a file.

I promised Stew some photos of how I use my home-brew height gauge.  There's a mini how-to (my way) coming up, but first off, for those that have not seen it yet, a year or two ago I built a height gauge that uses off the shelf unmodified cheap digital calipers - it can take both 150mm (6") and 200mm (8") calipers.  I've only ever used it with the 150mm caliper, and, contrary to my original intentions of leaving the caliper stock standard, I've sawed off the "sticky outy depth gauge part" - that is the long thin section that is attached to the moveable head.  For reference, this is what the tool looked like the day it was finished:

Unfortunately, some of the shiny bits picked up a lot of rust afterward  :embarassed:

First off, I measured the diameter of the workpiece with a caliper -it measured out to 9.88mm
Then I chucked it up in the collet chuck, and mounted the lot in the mill vise.  The mill bed was cleaned thoroughly  ( any swarf on there will throw out the readings in the next steps).  The height gauge was set to the top of the workpiece.  The read-out part of the height gauge is not visible here, but it's the only way to get the measurement.  So it was just moved down to the workpiece with the foot on the gauge touching the workpiece, and the caliper's lock screw tightened:


With the gauge reversed so I could see the display, It was zeroed.  Analogue gauges won't have this option. :


Having measured the workpiece diameter (9.88mm) earlier, it is easy to set the caliper to half of that (-4.94mm) to find the center line:


For reference, this is how the gauge compares to the workpiece after the last step:


With the digital gauges, it's easy to zero it off on the workpiece  center :


For the slot in the workpiece, I wanted a 1mm slot.  To set the slitting saw on center for that, I needed to halve the width of the saw. 1/2 = 0.5. So I adjusted that offset on the caliper:


I used that to set the height of the slitting saw by manually turning the mill spindle till the slitting saw blade _just_ touched the height gauge foot.


All slit and done - and the end of the mini how-to:


The final part:


The crankshaft and web needed pinning.   I poked a 2mm hole inn the lot - keeping the spindle speed on the low side so I wouldn't work-harden  the stainless steel shaft while drilling:


Don't adjust your monitor folks;  a bad photo showing the 2mm bronze pin I knocked into the hole - with some retainer fluid included:


I snipped off most of the excess of the pin, and used a small hammer to peen it over:


Off to some filing, and the pin is just about starting to disappear:


All together after some emery work after the filing, and the pin is pretty much invisible. Have a mouse clicky on the photo and see if you can find it  ;) :


A part that's not in the plans: I turned up a thin washer to go between the cross-head and the web:


A trial fit,,,,,and there was some interference.  The  crank rod was still a bit thick on the fork end, and left a score in the cross head bore:


Some filing on the crank rod solved that:


Finally some family photos:




With the edges knocked off the crank rod, everything works well.  A spacer might be needed between the crank web and the bearing though.

Kind regards, Arnold
« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 05:28:43 AM by arnoldb »
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline Maryak

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #199 on: May 12, 2013, 08:18:19 AM »

With due apologies to Bob Maryak, I deviated a bit from the plans for the crank pin.  Rather than using steel for it, I decided to make it from a combination of steel and brass.  The selection of materials is more "technically" correct rather than "hobby" correct; for hobby use all-steel would do just as well.  And, anyway, I used what I have on hand.  I could have made the entire crank pin from brass, but the M4 threaded section would carry quite a load while the engine is running.  The flywheel will end up carrying quite a bit of momentum, and IMHO in the overall design, the crank pin will be the weakest spot.

A spacer might be needed between the crank web and the bearing though.

Kind regards, Arnold

Arnold,

Please don't apologise. All these mods are fantastic and individual ways of doing things are .............well................individual  ;D

I'm not so sure about a spacer, may pay you to wait until the flywheel, eccentric and governor drive pulley are fitted. Which should remind you, (and our other reviewers), about the peer review of the rest of the bits.  :old:

Best Regards
Bob
Если вы у Тетушки были яйца, она была бы Дядюшкой

Offline tel

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #200 on: May 12, 2013, 08:38:16 AM »
Quote
All together after some emery work after the filing, and the pin is pretty much invisible. Have a mouse clicky on the photo and see if you can find it  ;) :

It'll do me for invisible - nice work!

Meanwhile my own version languishes on the bench - now I've knocked off to build a die filer! (Ain't it grand being your own boss) ;D
The older I get, the better I was.
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Offline steamer

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #201 on: May 12, 2013, 08:41:08 AM »
I see your modeling the latest in Dropbar protection!

 :ThumbsUp:
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Damned ijjit!

Offline Maryak

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #202 on: May 12, 2013, 08:57:15 AM »
I see your modeling the latest in Dropbar protection!

 :ThumbsUp:

Na...............he's just fezzing up to his awful taste in headgear  :slap:

Best Regards
Bob
Если вы у Тетушки были яйца, она была бы Дядюшкой

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #203 on: May 12, 2013, 09:17:29 AM »
Tel,
 I'll email my brother for you & see if he's got a spare camel! Might take him a while to walk it down from the far north though....... :stickpoke:   :lolb:

Arnold,
 I've been quietly soaking up your build & enjoying it. I was round my Dads a few days ago, & ratting around in a pile of back issues of M.E. by chance came across an article on the valve gear for these engines, sorry forgot to write it down, I'll go round this week & hut it out & post up the issue etc, may be of use

Cheers Kerrin
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Offline steamer

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #204 on: May 12, 2013, 09:17:54 AM »
Quote
All together after some emery work after the filing, and the pin is pretty much invisible. Have a mouse clicky on the photo and see if you can find it  ;) :

It'll do me for invisible - nice work!

Meanwhile my own version languishes on the bench - now I've knocked off to build a die filer! (Ain't it grand being your own boss) ;D


Start a thread on that Tel....love to see it!

Dave
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Damned ijjit!

Offline tel

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #205 on: May 12, 2013, 09:26:29 AM »
Pretty much just a modified version of the AME one - modified in the sense that I am building it out of materials to hand, so some of the sizes will be different. I'll start a post when I have a little more to show.
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Offline arnoldb

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #206 on: May 13, 2013, 06:34:50 PM »
 ::) No progress to report unfortunately...  I was planning a bit of woodworking yesterday to get things mounted on the base, but felt slightly under the weather.  That's gone over into a full-blown flu  :facepalm2:

Thanks Bob
Quote
I'm not so sure about a spacer, may pay you to wait until the flywheel, eccentric and governor drive pulley are fitted. Which should remind you, (and our other reviewers), about the peer review of the rest of the bits.  :old:
You're right; I'll hold off on any spacers etc - those are easy enough to make later as/if needed.  And I haven't forgotten about the peer review; will try and make some time to see if I can contribute N$0.02 or thereabouts. 

Cheers Tel - I've also been eyeing the die filers...  Sure would be handy for this project.  I can't take time out for tool-making unless it's essential at the moment though; I'll already have to take out some shop time in the next month or two to make room for a new arrival in the shop and add some lighting to a couple of dark spots.  And I'm running out of electric wall plugs as well  :facepalm2:.
Fancy a bag of Turkish Delights, or would a nice baklava be more to your taste - or maybe Raki   :LittleDevil:

Thanks Kerrin  :) - All information is useful!

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline tel

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #207 on: May 13, 2013, 08:12:43 PM »
The baklava would be good! At least you made no mention of organ grinder's monkeys - which is wot someone who used to be one of my daughters did! ;D
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Offline mklotz

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #208 on: May 13, 2013, 09:32:52 PM »
...which is wot someone who used to be one of my daughters did! ;D

Love it.  I'm gonna remember that one.  I have two of those daughter things too and they provide ample opportunity for lines like that.
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Offline tel

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Re: Arnold's take on the MEM Corliss
« Reply #209 on: May 14, 2013, 04:17:47 AM »
You're very welcome Marv. The usual royalties will, of course, apply! ;)
The older I get, the better I was.
Lacerta es reptiles quisnam mos non exsisto accuso nusquam