Author Topic: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings  (Read 147568 times)

Online sco

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2013, 08:40:37 AM »
This looks a really interesting build with some cool tooling.  Good crisp photos too  :ThumbsUp:
Ars longa, vita brevis.

Offline NickG

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2013, 09:24:59 AM »
Ditto, I'll be watching this one - nice looking castings and a great start  :ThumbsUp:

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2013, 11:50:01 PM »
Hi Everyone

Thanks for all the kind words; I appreciate it.

I went back ad read my response to Zee and I really didn't like the attitude that it seemed to portray; I was trying to poke fun at my lousy memory and it seemed that I come across as being somewhat arrogant. Anyway this is not the way I wanted to sound (ever); I struggle putting my thoughts into words sometimes (most times), so I'll try to proof read my stuff a little better.

Thanks,
Dave

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2013, 12:11:19 AM »
I started work on the cylinder next because the body casting hadn?t been received yet. Quite a bit of time was spent fettling (sp) before the machining was started.

I ended up flipping the cylinder end for end in the lathe a couple of times because I wanted to make sure I didn?t back my self into a corner. There was minimal material on the OD at the top above the exhaust valve boss and I wanted to be sure it was running as true as possible.

Considerable time was spent indicating to be sure every thing was going to work out ok.


Here the cylinder is set up and aligned in the 3 jaw chuck for the initial cuts.


A skim cut was taken in the bore to clean it up and also a cut on the OD of the flange so there would be something to indicate when the cylinder was flipped around.  Both of my 3 jaw and 6jaw chucks are set tru chucks; which makes them nice for this type of work.


The bottom end of the cylinder was roughed out and the cylinder flipped back around and chucked up on the newly machined skirt.


Now the bore is brought to with in .010? of final size.


Flipped around yet again (and indicated in) the register surface was cut under the cylinder flange. I don?t remember why I didn?t do this on the first set up; but I sure I had a good reason.




In the same setup the bosses for the water jacket cover were machined to size.


A final cut was taken in the 6 jaw chuck to bring the bore to the proper size for the shrink fit of liner.

I decided to drill and tap the water ports before the liner was installed so there would be plenty of space for the pipe tap. They are tapped 1/6? NPT which is also the same as 5/16-32 MTP.


Here is the cylinder set up in the mill to tap the water ports. The exhaust valve chest mounting boss had previously been milled. This is used as the angular datum for the bolt patterns and the other ports, water, intake, oil, and ignitor ports.


I didn?t take many pictures of the liner machining; here is an early shot drilling the cast iron bar stock.

The liner is a pretty straight forward turning job; however I did leave it a little long so I could face both ends after it was installed in the cylinder. About .005? was also left on each end of the cylinder for a finish pass after liner installation. This created an almost invisible joint.


With the liner now installed and bored (.003? was left for honing) the bolt patterns are being drilled. Notice the exhaust valve chest; mounting boss is positioned against the fixed jaw of the vise.


Now the cylinder is flipped over and indicated in to drill and tap the head stud circle. The two smaller holes are water passages; they intersect the water jacket space and will feed water to the head.


Here is the mostly finished cylinder. Left to do at this point is to finish the exhaust valve chest, mounting boss but I will wait until the valve chest is machined. The water jacket cover mounting holes need to be drilled and tapped and the ignitor holes finished.

Also completed at this point are the two oiler holes drilled and tapped ?-40 MTP and the intake port drilled and tapped 1/16? NPT

Thanks for checking in.

Dave
« Last Edit: July 04, 2017, 10:57:58 PM by Dave Otto »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2013, 01:11:42 AM »
Those are some real nice finishes you're getting.
I hope I get there someday.

Learned a few things from your post too. Always glad for that.

P.S. I took your reply as having fun. So no problem.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2013, 01:14:53 AM »
Thanks Zee,

That makes me feel better.

Dave

Offline black85vette

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2013, 01:38:34 AM »
Enjoying seeing your setups.   Nice work.  :ThumbsUp:

Online steamer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #22 on: January 21, 2013, 02:27:38 AM »
Yes great set ups and nice finish

Those castings are some of the nicest I've ever seen!

Dave
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Damned ijjit!

Offline Don1966

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #23 on: January 21, 2013, 03:01:35 AM »
Yea those are some nice setups. Great looking casting. They look like they have been bead blasted. Following with interest.

Don

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2013, 10:48:04 PM »
Hi everyone thanks again for the kind words; you are correct, these are very nice castings. They machine beautifully with not a hard spot to be found.

I like to do as much fettling as I can before any machine work is done; this at least for me lessons the chance of damaging a newly machined surface. Because I plan to paint the engine when it is completed I have sand blasted all the castings to give everything a more uniform finish. For Iron castings I prefer to use garnet abrasive as opposed to glass beads for blasting media.

I also have a small blast cabinet in my home shop that I keep super fine glass bead in; it is my favorite for brass and bronze as you will see later on.

Thanks again,
Dave

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2013, 11:19:42 PM »
Hi Everyone

A beautiful set of lost wax cast bronze water jacket covers were included in the casting kit. These covers are cast-flat and need to be bent to fit the curvature of the bosses on the cylinder. I wanted to bend them before the holes were drilled because I was concerned the holes may cause problems in the bending operation.


The covers were milled to length plus .005? for a cleanup cut after they were bent.


Also at this time the mounting holes were spotted for future reference.

I made some quick and dirty tooling to bend the plates in the arbor press. The bronze is quite springy and needs to be over-bent due the spring-back. I guessed about 10% and hit it pretty close.


The press tool was made from a piece of Nylon that was in the scrap box and worked great. I did an initial bend without the pocket for the letters and it didn?t work to well so a pocket was cut to clear the letters and it worked much better.


Here is one of the covers after being bent with the relived press tool.
The aluminum mandrill also from the scrap box already had the shoulder on it which worked well to keep the cover square with the bend axis.


Another piece of tooling was made to hold the covers for machining. It was turned to the same diameter as the pads on the cylinder. I transferred the 5C chuck from the lathe to the spin-indexer in the mill without removing the mandrill to insure concentricity.
Not shown in the pictures is that the top and bottom center holes of the cover were drilled in the vise after they were bent.


The indexer was used to roll the cover to the left and then to the right rows of holes. The covers were clearance drilled and the mandrill drilled and tapped 2-56.


After the covers were secured to the mandrel with all the screws; the spin-dex was returned to zero and the profile milled using the CNC.



One of the finished covers before being removed from the mandrel.


Here are the beautiful little covers bent, drilled and ready to mount on the cylinder!


An expanding mandrel was made to hold the cylinder for secondary machining operations which has worked out well. Here it is being used to drill and tap the 2-56 holes to mount the water jacket covers.
On the original engine these bosses were cored and open to the water jacket; but on the model there is no reason for this so the covers are just for looks.


The cover was manually positioned on the cylinder boss for the best possible alignment (it is a casting after all) and once the top center hole was located all the others were located from this datum.


After an enjoyable afternoon in the shop here are the fruits of my labor.



And a profile shot.



Next up will be the construction of the crankshaft.

Thanks for checking in,
Dave
« Last Edit: July 04, 2017, 11:27:27 PM by Dave Otto »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2013, 11:40:42 PM »
Nice post!
Great attention to detail.
That's going to look great.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #27 on: January 24, 2013, 12:28:16 AM »
Hi Everyone & thanks for the comments Zee I appreciate it,


I got a harebrained idea to make the crankshaft out of 1144 Stress-Proof thinking that it may stay a little straighter as the excess material was cut away. The smallest piece I could get that would work was 2 ?? dia. So a bunch of material needed to be removed.

After facing the stock to length in my lathe at home I took the blank to work so I could cut it down in my mill there. Flood coolant, a face mill and a 10 hp. Spindle motor made quick work of it.

Also while in the mill at work I drilled the centers and removed the excess material for the throw.


Cutting to length


The Stress-Proof sure turns nice


In my mill at work getting ready to make the round bar into a rectangle


Pretty much to size; I left .050? on the thickness so I could finish it on my friends shaper later on.


Set up to drill the centers


Action shot!


And the finished centers

After the excess material was removed for the throw; I did have to straighten it a little. It had about .02? bow over the length; a little tweaking in the arbor press got it acceptable.


Here is the blank set up in the lathe to turn the throw. The wire near the end is hold the blank against a threaded stud which I?m using to drive the blank. The stud is screwed into a hole in the flange of the collet adaptor.


Action shot!


Here it is with the throw pretty much finished. Besides the turning tool shown I also use small left and right hand insert tools to finish the inside faces of the cheeks



Using the band saw to blank out the extra material; the Roll-In saw makes this part of the job a breeze.


Both sides have been cut and now it?s ready to go back in the lathe; it?s starting to look like a crankshaft now.


Set up between centers and turning the long end.


I ended up turning the shafts to fractional dimensions larger than the finished size so I could rough it out and use collets for holding the already turned ends. My original plan was to do the whole job between centers; but I was fighting chatter real bad and the collet solved this aggravating problem. Here it is flipped around and working on the short end


Here is the set up in the mill to cut the key ways.


And a closer shot.


After the crank was finished I took it over to my friends shop and used his shaper to finish the cheeks to .750? thick. Remember that I had left them over size in anticipation of this. The shaper creates a finish that looks like it could have been ground. The shaper is also going to get a workout cutting the bearing pads on the body casting.


As I told my buddy; the bench centers allow you analyze or agonize over really small TIR numbers. Over all I?m very happy with the way the crank turned out.

Next up; starting work on the body casting.

Thanks for checking in.
Dave

« Last Edit: July 04, 2017, 11:45:08 PM by Dave Otto »

Offline black85vette

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #28 on: January 24, 2013, 01:29:01 AM »
Great looking crank.   Love the details with the plates.  Way out of my league in equipment, skill and experience!   I will just sit back and enjoy the fact that somebody can do this.

Offline swilliams

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Re: Pacific Vapor Engine from Morrison & Marvin Castings
« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2013, 12:18:33 AM »
Alot to like here Dave.
What diameter is the flywheel on this engine?

Steve