Author Topic: My Workshop  (Read 10366 times)

Offline propforward

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Re: My Workshop - a long time dream come true.
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2013, 06:56:39 PM »
Fair enough.

Actually, it's a really inconvenient place for tools now that I've used it for a while. I think what I would prefer to do is move the pegboard over to one of the other benches to hold more wrenches etc, and put up a dry erase board and a cork board in place of this one, for pinning drawings and sketches to. I think that would be more useful.

Miles safer too.  :ThumbsUp:
« Last Edit: January 05, 2013, 07:00:11 PM by propforward »
Stuart

Offline mklotz

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Re: My Workshop - a long time dream come true.
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2013, 08:58:45 PM »
If you must hang things behind the lathe, do it at the tailstock end and reserve the headstock end for Ridgid calendars and other such examples of fine art.

Lots of my tooling is used on both the lathe and the mill.  An inexpensive rolling cart, e.g.,

http://www.harborfreight.com/large-steel-tool-cart-with-locking-drawer-90428.html

will hold items not conveniently stored in a mechanic's rolling tool cabinet (e.g. chucks) and can obviously be easily re-positioned.  No matter how big your shop is, having stuff on wheels is a good idea.
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Offline propforward

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Re: My Workshop
« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2013, 02:32:00 AM »
True dat.

I have actually spent some time this evening evaluating that pegboard above the lathe, and I have a perfect new position for it, which puts it midway between the lathe and where the mill will be eventually. So this will make it quite convenient for both tools, but prevent reaching past moving parts for things. I think this will work well.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2013, 02:51:23 PM by propforward »
Stuart

Offline mklotz

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Re: My Workshop - a long time dream come true.
« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2013, 04:37:32 PM »
Good.  We want you to be safe.
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Offline propforward

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Re: My Workshop
« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2013, 02:37:32 AM »
I made some adjustments tonight. I now have a whiteboard behind the lathe, to stick drawings to and to put sketches on to refer to. The pegboard I cut in half, and put part over on the other wall, as you can see. I will likely change some of the locations of tools and things. The simple lumber shelf will be moving down closer to the lathe, and think the chuck keys will go on top of that, as it puts them in easier reach. I will find the optimum position for everything as I go on, but this is a good start.

« Last Edit: January 28, 2013, 04:18:29 PM by propforward »
Stuart

Offline mklotz

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Re: My Workshop
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2013, 04:43:31 PM »
My lathe has a flat, hinged lid on the top of the headstock similar to what I see in your pictures.  It covers the drive belt pulley so it must be raised whenever I need to change the speed.  I presume that your arrangement is similar.

I quickly discovered that it was inevitable that small tools (eg drills, mike, file) would end up on that tray; it was just too handy.  Removing them to tilt the lid was a pain.  Plus the low "fence" on the edge of the lid meant there was a chance that a small item could roll/jiggle off, land on the spinning chuck and become a projectile.

At the local craft store they sell smallish unfinished wooden trays that crafters buy and "decorate" with hideous designs in offensive colors.  I bought a selection of these.

One of these fit the headstock top tray rather well and resides there permanently now.  Its 1.5" high sides prevent roll aways and, when I need to change speeds it's a simple matter to pick up the tray and its contents and set them aside.

The other, smaller trays went on my workbench top where they collect small tools, etc..  When I need to work on a large object again it's simple to set aside the whole tray rather than deal with a collection of small items. 
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Offline propforward

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Re: My Workshop
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2013, 04:49:39 PM »
You are absolutely right, that is a hinged lid, and I have been making sure to have locations for chuck keys etc that make them handy, so that I avoid putting things on that lid. But I like the tray idea. I definitely need something, because the top shelf of the wooden shelf system in the picture is too cluttered.

In fact, your idea now gives me something to do at lunch. I wonder if I can find some cheap organiser system that would allow me to tidy up that shelf?

A little tray that held only the chuck keys on top of the gearbox lid would certainly work well though. Hmmmm.  :thinking:

I really hate clutter.

Often what you need to do jumps out as you start using the area, so that is the next step. I also like roll carts, as you mentioned before.
Stuart

Offline mklotz

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Re: My Workshop
« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2013, 05:11:29 PM »
If simply sitting the tray on the lid seems insecure to you, you can add some metal ells to the bottom of the tray so they slip over the edges of the lid and keep the tray fixed when on the lid.  Alternatively, you can glue magnets to the bottom of the tray but that raises the chance of magnetizing your tools - something I detest.

And, if you like the brown stuff, you can always custom build a tray to fit snugly over the lid.  Such a tray could have, as a firm attachment, a wooden block with holes to match the handles of the chuck keys. 

As you say, these things work themselves out as one uses them.  Form follows function.
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Offline propforward

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Re: My Workshop
« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2013, 06:15:36 PM »
If simply sitting the tray on the lid seems insecure to you, you can add some metal ells to the bottom of the tray so they slip over the edges of the lid and keep the tray fixed when on the lid.

Not as such, I probably didn't explain myself very well. It's just that since opening that lid is a routine necessity for changing speed, I have got myself into the frame of mind of "thou shalt not put things here matey". I get into these frames of mind all the time, and sometimes it takes someone else to point out that "actually if you do it like this, it's not such a big deal". Having a little tray up there seems like a neat and easy idea. I might try it, because I like having the chuck keys right close at hand.

EDIT: The more I think about this tray thing, the more I like it. I'm afraid I get quite exciteable about small matters like this. :D
« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 06:24:15 PM by propforward »
Stuart

Offline Chris J

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Re: My Workshop
« Reply #24 on: January 30, 2013, 12:23:51 AM »
If simply sitting the tray on the lid seems insecure to you, you can add some metal ells to the bottom of the tray so they slip over the edges of the lid and keep the tray fixed when on the lid.

Not as such, I probably didn't explain myself very well. It's just that since opening that lid is a routine necessity for changing speed, I have got myself into the frame of mind of "thou shalt not put things here matey". I get into these frames of mind all the time, and sometimes it takes someone else to point out that "actually if you do it like this, it's not such a big deal". Having a little tray up there seems like a neat and easy idea. I might try it, because I like having the chuck keys right close at hand.

EDIT: The more I think about this tray thing, the more I like it. I'm afraid I get quite exciteable about small matters like this. :D

I thought I was the king of the clean white spartan look, you take it to a new level !! Very nice

How about 4 small stick on bits of velcro under the tray to aid removal if necessary ?
Don't believe everything you read on the internet - Abraham Lincoln.

Offline propforward

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Re: My Workshop
« Reply #25 on: January 30, 2013, 01:41:53 AM »
I thought I was the king of the clean white spartan look, you take it to a new level !! Very nice

How about 4 small stick on bits of velcro under the tray to aid removal if necessary ?

Thank you! I do like nice, bright, tidy workspaces.

I ended up moving the wood shelves closer towards the lathe, and now the chuck keys live on the top shelf of that. It turns out that puts them in a very nice location to get easily, and I don't feel a need to sit anything on top of the lathe after all, so actually it's a major win. Now I use the whiteboard behind the machine to stick up drawings, or to draw sketches on before I start turning - or to write down the sequence of machining events - this whole arrangement is much better and safer use of the space, so cheers to Marv.

I do want to get some trays and storage draws to add to the wooden shelves for a little better organisation of cutter bits, but overall I am very happy with the layout.

The velcro is a good idea though.  :thinking: I see possibilities there.
Stuart